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10 Things You Didn’t Know About Outback Steakhouse

10 Things You Didn’t Know About Outback Steakhouse



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What’s the one word you associate with Outback Steakhouse? Considering the accent featured in every Outback commercial it would be Australia, right? Well in fact, Outback’s founders hadn’t ever visited Australia before opening their first location. Just Right” chain.

10 Things You Didn’t Know About Outback Steakhouse (Slideshow)

Outback Steakhouse was founded in February 1988 by four restaurant industry veterans, Bob Basham, Chris T. Sullivan, Trudy Cooper, and Tim Gannon. In the late 1980s, the film Crocodile Dundee and its sequels were huge hits and sparked a wave of enthusiasm for all things Aussie in America (like throwing shrimp on the barbie). Australia was cool, and Outback opened to ride that wave from Down Under. Its fun and novel atmosphere paired with the fact that diners could enjoy a steak dinner for far less money than your average steakhouse were keys to success, and the chain’s popularity took off, going public in 1991 as a 49-restaurant chain.

Today there are more than 1,200 Outback locations in 23 countries, including North and South America, Asia, Europe, and even (yes) Australia, where there are seven locations. The restaurant group that runs Outback, Bloomin’ Brands, also owns Bonefish Grill, Carrabba’s Italian Grill, and Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse and Wine Bar.

Yes, Outback is about as American as it gets, with its huge steaks and deep-fried appetizers. It’s a theme restaurant, just like Olive Garden doesn’t actually have any Italian roots. But as far as chain restaurants go, Outback is one that’s just about impossible to dislike. Read on for 10 things you didn’t know about Outback Steakhouse.

Outback’s Founders Never Visited Australia


Yep: When the founders were putting together their business plan, none of them had ever visited the continent and they weren’t even particularly well-versed in its food or customs. Apparently a research trip was proposed but shot down, because all the founders were going for was “American food and Australian fun.”

Outback’s Steak Spice Blend Contains 17 Spices


That spice blend took a long time to develop, but it wasn’t created for the restaurant; co-founder Tim Gannon actually developed the recipe while working as a chef at a restaurant called Copeland’s in New Orleans. So if anything, Outback’s steaks have more of a Cajun kick than an Aussie one.


G'Day! 10 Facts About Outback Steakhouse

Don’t let the accent fool you: With its generously seasoned steaks, deep-fried shrimp platters, and sauce-drenched desserts, Outback Steakhouse’s cuisine is way more American than Australian. And most people seem to be okay with that. In 30 years time, Outback has gone from an underwhelming opening to become one of the most popular restaurant chains in America—a place where the Fosters is always flowing, and where you’ll likely find more than one boomerang stuck to the wall.

1. IT IS NOT, IN FACT, A TASTE OF THE OUTBACK.

You may be shocked to learn that a Bloomin' Onion is not a traditional dish of the Australian Outback. Nor are Aussie Fries or Alice Springs Chicken Quesadillas. But considering that real Outback cuisine includes bush tomatoes and wattleseed biscuits, you’re probably okay with that.

2. YOU CAN THANK CROCODILE DUNDEE.

Back in 1986, Paul Hogan introduced Americans to the image of Australians as rugged, carefree, and always carrying a big knife. Crocodile Dundee was the second most popular film in America that year, and created a cultural wave that Outback Steakhouse’s founders hoped to ride. In March 1988, they opened the first location in Tampa, Florida.

3. NONE OF THE FOUNDERS HAD EVER BEEN TO AUSTRALIA.

All three were veterans of the restaurant industry and wanted to invest in a novel concept. After developing the idea for Outback Steakhouse, a research trip was proposed and then quickly shot down. According to co-founder Chris Sullivan, they didn’t want to be influenced by the cuisine or otherwise put off their mission to deliver “American food and Australian fun.”

4. IT DID NOT HAVE A PROMISING START.

Opening day was as desolate as a sun-baked highway stretching to the horizon. Employees at the Tampa, Florida location had to park in the lot to make it look busy and call their friends and family and invite them to come in. To drum up business, the founders invested in ads and promotions, and eventually word got around.

5. NEW ORLEANS WAS A BIG INFLUENCE.

Co-founder Tim Gannon developed the Bloomin' Onion while working as a chef in New Orleans, using different spice combinations to season his deep-fried onion concoction. The 18 different seasonings used to marinate Outback’s steaks are also inspired by The Big Easy.

6. THERE'S ONLY ONE BLOOMIN' ONION.

Well, actually there are many—they just go by different names. There’s LongHorn Steakhouse’s Texas Rose, Chili’s Awesome Blossom (which was discontinued a few years back), and the thousands upon thousands of concoctions people create in their own kitchens using an at-home onion fryer. But only Outback's onions are crafted by "dedicated bloomologists."

7. THERE ACTUALLY ARE LOCATIONS IN AUSTRALIA.

Seven, to be exact, which means Australians must not find Outback Steakhouse completely offensive. There are subtle changes, like a menu that lists “prawns” instead of “shrimp,” and a grammatically incorrect tagline that exhorts diners to “Live Adventurous.”

8. THEY JUST STARTED SERVING LUNCH.

Lunch has traditionally been viewed as a money-loser in the restaurant industry, but that’s starting to change as fast-casual companies like Chipotle rake in the dough. So Outback decided to give it a go with $6.99 combo meals and more 100% not-Australian dishes like Aussie Tacos.

9. THEY ONCE SOLD STEAK FLIGHTS.

For a fleeting few weeks back in 2013, Outback offered diners three 3-oz. steaks with a choice of four sauces. It sounds pretty fancy, until you learn that one of the sauces was called Creamy Diablo.

10. FLIGHT OF THE CONCHORDS' JEMAINE CLEMENT STARRED IN A SERIES OF ADS.

Never mind that Clement’s from New Zealand, not Australia— the ads are still pretty funny.


G'Day! 10 Facts About Outback Steakhouse

Don’t let the accent fool you: With its generously seasoned steaks, deep-fried shrimp platters, and sauce-drenched desserts, Outback Steakhouse’s cuisine is way more American than Australian. And most people seem to be okay with that. In 30 years time, Outback has gone from an underwhelming opening to become one of the most popular restaurant chains in America—a place where the Fosters is always flowing, and where you’ll likely find more than one boomerang stuck to the wall.

1. IT IS NOT, IN FACT, A TASTE OF THE OUTBACK.

You may be shocked to learn that a Bloomin' Onion is not a traditional dish of the Australian Outback. Nor are Aussie Fries or Alice Springs Chicken Quesadillas. But considering that real Outback cuisine includes bush tomatoes and wattleseed biscuits, you’re probably okay with that.

2. YOU CAN THANK CROCODILE DUNDEE.

Back in 1986, Paul Hogan introduced Americans to the image of Australians as rugged, carefree, and always carrying a big knife. Crocodile Dundee was the second most popular film in America that year, and created a cultural wave that Outback Steakhouse’s founders hoped to ride. In March 1988, they opened the first location in Tampa, Florida.

3. NONE OF THE FOUNDERS HAD EVER BEEN TO AUSTRALIA.

All three were veterans of the restaurant industry and wanted to invest in a novel concept. After developing the idea for Outback Steakhouse, a research trip was proposed and then quickly shot down. According to co-founder Chris Sullivan, they didn’t want to be influenced by the cuisine or otherwise put off their mission to deliver “American food and Australian fun.”

4. IT DID NOT HAVE A PROMISING START.

Opening day was as desolate as a sun-baked highway stretching to the horizon. Employees at the Tampa, Florida location had to park in the lot to make it look busy and call their friends and family and invite them to come in. To drum up business, the founders invested in ads and promotions, and eventually word got around.

5. NEW ORLEANS WAS A BIG INFLUENCE.

Co-founder Tim Gannon developed the Bloomin' Onion while working as a chef in New Orleans, using different spice combinations to season his deep-fried onion concoction. The 18 different seasonings used to marinate Outback’s steaks are also inspired by The Big Easy.

6. THERE'S ONLY ONE BLOOMIN' ONION.

Well, actually there are many—they just go by different names. There’s LongHorn Steakhouse’s Texas Rose, Chili’s Awesome Blossom (which was discontinued a few years back), and the thousands upon thousands of concoctions people create in their own kitchens using an at-home onion fryer. But only Outback's onions are crafted by "dedicated bloomologists."

7. THERE ACTUALLY ARE LOCATIONS IN AUSTRALIA.

Seven, to be exact, which means Australians must not find Outback Steakhouse completely offensive. There are subtle changes, like a menu that lists “prawns” instead of “shrimp,” and a grammatically incorrect tagline that exhorts diners to “Live Adventurous.”

8. THEY JUST STARTED SERVING LUNCH.

Lunch has traditionally been viewed as a money-loser in the restaurant industry, but that’s starting to change as fast-casual companies like Chipotle rake in the dough. So Outback decided to give it a go with $6.99 combo meals and more 100% not-Australian dishes like Aussie Tacos.

9. THEY ONCE SOLD STEAK FLIGHTS.

For a fleeting few weeks back in 2013, Outback offered diners three 3-oz. steaks with a choice of four sauces. It sounds pretty fancy, until you learn that one of the sauces was called Creamy Diablo.

10. FLIGHT OF THE CONCHORDS' JEMAINE CLEMENT STARRED IN A SERIES OF ADS.

Never mind that Clement’s from New Zealand, not Australia— the ads are still pretty funny.


G'Day! 10 Facts About Outback Steakhouse

Don’t let the accent fool you: With its generously seasoned steaks, deep-fried shrimp platters, and sauce-drenched desserts, Outback Steakhouse’s cuisine is way more American than Australian. And most people seem to be okay with that. In 30 years time, Outback has gone from an underwhelming opening to become one of the most popular restaurant chains in America—a place where the Fosters is always flowing, and where you’ll likely find more than one boomerang stuck to the wall.

1. IT IS NOT, IN FACT, A TASTE OF THE OUTBACK.

You may be shocked to learn that a Bloomin' Onion is not a traditional dish of the Australian Outback. Nor are Aussie Fries or Alice Springs Chicken Quesadillas. But considering that real Outback cuisine includes bush tomatoes and wattleseed biscuits, you’re probably okay with that.

2. YOU CAN THANK CROCODILE DUNDEE.

Back in 1986, Paul Hogan introduced Americans to the image of Australians as rugged, carefree, and always carrying a big knife. Crocodile Dundee was the second most popular film in America that year, and created a cultural wave that Outback Steakhouse’s founders hoped to ride. In March 1988, they opened the first location in Tampa, Florida.

3. NONE OF THE FOUNDERS HAD EVER BEEN TO AUSTRALIA.

All three were veterans of the restaurant industry and wanted to invest in a novel concept. After developing the idea for Outback Steakhouse, a research trip was proposed and then quickly shot down. According to co-founder Chris Sullivan, they didn’t want to be influenced by the cuisine or otherwise put off their mission to deliver “American food and Australian fun.”

4. IT DID NOT HAVE A PROMISING START.

Opening day was as desolate as a sun-baked highway stretching to the horizon. Employees at the Tampa, Florida location had to park in the lot to make it look busy and call their friends and family and invite them to come in. To drum up business, the founders invested in ads and promotions, and eventually word got around.

5. NEW ORLEANS WAS A BIG INFLUENCE.

Co-founder Tim Gannon developed the Bloomin' Onion while working as a chef in New Orleans, using different spice combinations to season his deep-fried onion concoction. The 18 different seasonings used to marinate Outback’s steaks are also inspired by The Big Easy.

6. THERE'S ONLY ONE BLOOMIN' ONION.

Well, actually there are many—they just go by different names. There’s LongHorn Steakhouse’s Texas Rose, Chili’s Awesome Blossom (which was discontinued a few years back), and the thousands upon thousands of concoctions people create in their own kitchens using an at-home onion fryer. But only Outback's onions are crafted by "dedicated bloomologists."

7. THERE ACTUALLY ARE LOCATIONS IN AUSTRALIA.

Seven, to be exact, which means Australians must not find Outback Steakhouse completely offensive. There are subtle changes, like a menu that lists “prawns” instead of “shrimp,” and a grammatically incorrect tagline that exhorts diners to “Live Adventurous.”

8. THEY JUST STARTED SERVING LUNCH.

Lunch has traditionally been viewed as a money-loser in the restaurant industry, but that’s starting to change as fast-casual companies like Chipotle rake in the dough. So Outback decided to give it a go with $6.99 combo meals and more 100% not-Australian dishes like Aussie Tacos.

9. THEY ONCE SOLD STEAK FLIGHTS.

For a fleeting few weeks back in 2013, Outback offered diners three 3-oz. steaks with a choice of four sauces. It sounds pretty fancy, until you learn that one of the sauces was called Creamy Diablo.

10. FLIGHT OF THE CONCHORDS' JEMAINE CLEMENT STARRED IN A SERIES OF ADS.

Never mind that Clement’s from New Zealand, not Australia— the ads are still pretty funny.


G'Day! 10 Facts About Outback Steakhouse

Don’t let the accent fool you: With its generously seasoned steaks, deep-fried shrimp platters, and sauce-drenched desserts, Outback Steakhouse’s cuisine is way more American than Australian. And most people seem to be okay with that. In 30 years time, Outback has gone from an underwhelming opening to become one of the most popular restaurant chains in America—a place where the Fosters is always flowing, and where you’ll likely find more than one boomerang stuck to the wall.

1. IT IS NOT, IN FACT, A TASTE OF THE OUTBACK.

You may be shocked to learn that a Bloomin' Onion is not a traditional dish of the Australian Outback. Nor are Aussie Fries or Alice Springs Chicken Quesadillas. But considering that real Outback cuisine includes bush tomatoes and wattleseed biscuits, you’re probably okay with that.

2. YOU CAN THANK CROCODILE DUNDEE.

Back in 1986, Paul Hogan introduced Americans to the image of Australians as rugged, carefree, and always carrying a big knife. Crocodile Dundee was the second most popular film in America that year, and created a cultural wave that Outback Steakhouse’s founders hoped to ride. In March 1988, they opened the first location in Tampa, Florida.

3. NONE OF THE FOUNDERS HAD EVER BEEN TO AUSTRALIA.

All three were veterans of the restaurant industry and wanted to invest in a novel concept. After developing the idea for Outback Steakhouse, a research trip was proposed and then quickly shot down. According to co-founder Chris Sullivan, they didn’t want to be influenced by the cuisine or otherwise put off their mission to deliver “American food and Australian fun.”

4. IT DID NOT HAVE A PROMISING START.

Opening day was as desolate as a sun-baked highway stretching to the horizon. Employees at the Tampa, Florida location had to park in the lot to make it look busy and call their friends and family and invite them to come in. To drum up business, the founders invested in ads and promotions, and eventually word got around.

5. NEW ORLEANS WAS A BIG INFLUENCE.

Co-founder Tim Gannon developed the Bloomin' Onion while working as a chef in New Orleans, using different spice combinations to season his deep-fried onion concoction. The 18 different seasonings used to marinate Outback’s steaks are also inspired by The Big Easy.

6. THERE'S ONLY ONE BLOOMIN' ONION.

Well, actually there are many—they just go by different names. There’s LongHorn Steakhouse’s Texas Rose, Chili’s Awesome Blossom (which was discontinued a few years back), and the thousands upon thousands of concoctions people create in their own kitchens using an at-home onion fryer. But only Outback's onions are crafted by "dedicated bloomologists."

7. THERE ACTUALLY ARE LOCATIONS IN AUSTRALIA.

Seven, to be exact, which means Australians must not find Outback Steakhouse completely offensive. There are subtle changes, like a menu that lists “prawns” instead of “shrimp,” and a grammatically incorrect tagline that exhorts diners to “Live Adventurous.”

8. THEY JUST STARTED SERVING LUNCH.

Lunch has traditionally been viewed as a money-loser in the restaurant industry, but that’s starting to change as fast-casual companies like Chipotle rake in the dough. So Outback decided to give it a go with $6.99 combo meals and more 100% not-Australian dishes like Aussie Tacos.

9. THEY ONCE SOLD STEAK FLIGHTS.

For a fleeting few weeks back in 2013, Outback offered diners three 3-oz. steaks with a choice of four sauces. It sounds pretty fancy, until you learn that one of the sauces was called Creamy Diablo.

10. FLIGHT OF THE CONCHORDS' JEMAINE CLEMENT STARRED IN A SERIES OF ADS.

Never mind that Clement’s from New Zealand, not Australia— the ads are still pretty funny.


G'Day! 10 Facts About Outback Steakhouse

Don’t let the accent fool you: With its generously seasoned steaks, deep-fried shrimp platters, and sauce-drenched desserts, Outback Steakhouse’s cuisine is way more American than Australian. And most people seem to be okay with that. In 30 years time, Outback has gone from an underwhelming opening to become one of the most popular restaurant chains in America—a place where the Fosters is always flowing, and where you’ll likely find more than one boomerang stuck to the wall.

1. IT IS NOT, IN FACT, A TASTE OF THE OUTBACK.

You may be shocked to learn that a Bloomin' Onion is not a traditional dish of the Australian Outback. Nor are Aussie Fries or Alice Springs Chicken Quesadillas. But considering that real Outback cuisine includes bush tomatoes and wattleseed biscuits, you’re probably okay with that.

2. YOU CAN THANK CROCODILE DUNDEE.

Back in 1986, Paul Hogan introduced Americans to the image of Australians as rugged, carefree, and always carrying a big knife. Crocodile Dundee was the second most popular film in America that year, and created a cultural wave that Outback Steakhouse’s founders hoped to ride. In March 1988, they opened the first location in Tampa, Florida.

3. NONE OF THE FOUNDERS HAD EVER BEEN TO AUSTRALIA.

All three were veterans of the restaurant industry and wanted to invest in a novel concept. After developing the idea for Outback Steakhouse, a research trip was proposed and then quickly shot down. According to co-founder Chris Sullivan, they didn’t want to be influenced by the cuisine or otherwise put off their mission to deliver “American food and Australian fun.”

4. IT DID NOT HAVE A PROMISING START.

Opening day was as desolate as a sun-baked highway stretching to the horizon. Employees at the Tampa, Florida location had to park in the lot to make it look busy and call their friends and family and invite them to come in. To drum up business, the founders invested in ads and promotions, and eventually word got around.

5. NEW ORLEANS WAS A BIG INFLUENCE.

Co-founder Tim Gannon developed the Bloomin' Onion while working as a chef in New Orleans, using different spice combinations to season his deep-fried onion concoction. The 18 different seasonings used to marinate Outback’s steaks are also inspired by The Big Easy.

6. THERE'S ONLY ONE BLOOMIN' ONION.

Well, actually there are many—they just go by different names. There’s LongHorn Steakhouse’s Texas Rose, Chili’s Awesome Blossom (which was discontinued a few years back), and the thousands upon thousands of concoctions people create in their own kitchens using an at-home onion fryer. But only Outback's onions are crafted by "dedicated bloomologists."

7. THERE ACTUALLY ARE LOCATIONS IN AUSTRALIA.

Seven, to be exact, which means Australians must not find Outback Steakhouse completely offensive. There are subtle changes, like a menu that lists “prawns” instead of “shrimp,” and a grammatically incorrect tagline that exhorts diners to “Live Adventurous.”

8. THEY JUST STARTED SERVING LUNCH.

Lunch has traditionally been viewed as a money-loser in the restaurant industry, but that’s starting to change as fast-casual companies like Chipotle rake in the dough. So Outback decided to give it a go with $6.99 combo meals and more 100% not-Australian dishes like Aussie Tacos.

9. THEY ONCE SOLD STEAK FLIGHTS.

For a fleeting few weeks back in 2013, Outback offered diners three 3-oz. steaks with a choice of four sauces. It sounds pretty fancy, until you learn that one of the sauces was called Creamy Diablo.

10. FLIGHT OF THE CONCHORDS' JEMAINE CLEMENT STARRED IN A SERIES OF ADS.

Never mind that Clement’s from New Zealand, not Australia— the ads are still pretty funny.


G'Day! 10 Facts About Outback Steakhouse

Don’t let the accent fool you: With its generously seasoned steaks, deep-fried shrimp platters, and sauce-drenched desserts, Outback Steakhouse’s cuisine is way more American than Australian. And most people seem to be okay with that. In 30 years time, Outback has gone from an underwhelming opening to become one of the most popular restaurant chains in America—a place where the Fosters is always flowing, and where you’ll likely find more than one boomerang stuck to the wall.

1. IT IS NOT, IN FACT, A TASTE OF THE OUTBACK.

You may be shocked to learn that a Bloomin' Onion is not a traditional dish of the Australian Outback. Nor are Aussie Fries or Alice Springs Chicken Quesadillas. But considering that real Outback cuisine includes bush tomatoes and wattleseed biscuits, you’re probably okay with that.

2. YOU CAN THANK CROCODILE DUNDEE.

Back in 1986, Paul Hogan introduced Americans to the image of Australians as rugged, carefree, and always carrying a big knife. Crocodile Dundee was the second most popular film in America that year, and created a cultural wave that Outback Steakhouse’s founders hoped to ride. In March 1988, they opened the first location in Tampa, Florida.

3. NONE OF THE FOUNDERS HAD EVER BEEN TO AUSTRALIA.

All three were veterans of the restaurant industry and wanted to invest in a novel concept. After developing the idea for Outback Steakhouse, a research trip was proposed and then quickly shot down. According to co-founder Chris Sullivan, they didn’t want to be influenced by the cuisine or otherwise put off their mission to deliver “American food and Australian fun.”

4. IT DID NOT HAVE A PROMISING START.

Opening day was as desolate as a sun-baked highway stretching to the horizon. Employees at the Tampa, Florida location had to park in the lot to make it look busy and call their friends and family and invite them to come in. To drum up business, the founders invested in ads and promotions, and eventually word got around.

5. NEW ORLEANS WAS A BIG INFLUENCE.

Co-founder Tim Gannon developed the Bloomin' Onion while working as a chef in New Orleans, using different spice combinations to season his deep-fried onion concoction. The 18 different seasonings used to marinate Outback’s steaks are also inspired by The Big Easy.

6. THERE'S ONLY ONE BLOOMIN' ONION.

Well, actually there are many—they just go by different names. There’s LongHorn Steakhouse’s Texas Rose, Chili’s Awesome Blossom (which was discontinued a few years back), and the thousands upon thousands of concoctions people create in their own kitchens using an at-home onion fryer. But only Outback's onions are crafted by "dedicated bloomologists."

7. THERE ACTUALLY ARE LOCATIONS IN AUSTRALIA.

Seven, to be exact, which means Australians must not find Outback Steakhouse completely offensive. There are subtle changes, like a menu that lists “prawns” instead of “shrimp,” and a grammatically incorrect tagline that exhorts diners to “Live Adventurous.”

8. THEY JUST STARTED SERVING LUNCH.

Lunch has traditionally been viewed as a money-loser in the restaurant industry, but that’s starting to change as fast-casual companies like Chipotle rake in the dough. So Outback decided to give it a go with $6.99 combo meals and more 100% not-Australian dishes like Aussie Tacos.

9. THEY ONCE SOLD STEAK FLIGHTS.

For a fleeting few weeks back in 2013, Outback offered diners three 3-oz. steaks with a choice of four sauces. It sounds pretty fancy, until you learn that one of the sauces was called Creamy Diablo.

10. FLIGHT OF THE CONCHORDS' JEMAINE CLEMENT STARRED IN A SERIES OF ADS.

Never mind that Clement’s from New Zealand, not Australia— the ads are still pretty funny.


G'Day! 10 Facts About Outback Steakhouse

Don’t let the accent fool you: With its generously seasoned steaks, deep-fried shrimp platters, and sauce-drenched desserts, Outback Steakhouse’s cuisine is way more American than Australian. And most people seem to be okay with that. In 30 years time, Outback has gone from an underwhelming opening to become one of the most popular restaurant chains in America—a place where the Fosters is always flowing, and where you’ll likely find more than one boomerang stuck to the wall.

1. IT IS NOT, IN FACT, A TASTE OF THE OUTBACK.

You may be shocked to learn that a Bloomin' Onion is not a traditional dish of the Australian Outback. Nor are Aussie Fries or Alice Springs Chicken Quesadillas. But considering that real Outback cuisine includes bush tomatoes and wattleseed biscuits, you’re probably okay with that.

2. YOU CAN THANK CROCODILE DUNDEE.

Back in 1986, Paul Hogan introduced Americans to the image of Australians as rugged, carefree, and always carrying a big knife. Crocodile Dundee was the second most popular film in America that year, and created a cultural wave that Outback Steakhouse’s founders hoped to ride. In March 1988, they opened the first location in Tampa, Florida.

3. NONE OF THE FOUNDERS HAD EVER BEEN TO AUSTRALIA.

All three were veterans of the restaurant industry and wanted to invest in a novel concept. After developing the idea for Outback Steakhouse, a research trip was proposed and then quickly shot down. According to co-founder Chris Sullivan, they didn’t want to be influenced by the cuisine or otherwise put off their mission to deliver “American food and Australian fun.”

4. IT DID NOT HAVE A PROMISING START.

Opening day was as desolate as a sun-baked highway stretching to the horizon. Employees at the Tampa, Florida location had to park in the lot to make it look busy and call their friends and family and invite them to come in. To drum up business, the founders invested in ads and promotions, and eventually word got around.

5. NEW ORLEANS WAS A BIG INFLUENCE.

Co-founder Tim Gannon developed the Bloomin' Onion while working as a chef in New Orleans, using different spice combinations to season his deep-fried onion concoction. The 18 different seasonings used to marinate Outback’s steaks are also inspired by The Big Easy.

6. THERE'S ONLY ONE BLOOMIN' ONION.

Well, actually there are many—they just go by different names. There’s LongHorn Steakhouse’s Texas Rose, Chili’s Awesome Blossom (which was discontinued a few years back), and the thousands upon thousands of concoctions people create in their own kitchens using an at-home onion fryer. But only Outback's onions are crafted by "dedicated bloomologists."

7. THERE ACTUALLY ARE LOCATIONS IN AUSTRALIA.

Seven, to be exact, which means Australians must not find Outback Steakhouse completely offensive. There are subtle changes, like a menu that lists “prawns” instead of “shrimp,” and a grammatically incorrect tagline that exhorts diners to “Live Adventurous.”

8. THEY JUST STARTED SERVING LUNCH.

Lunch has traditionally been viewed as a money-loser in the restaurant industry, but that’s starting to change as fast-casual companies like Chipotle rake in the dough. So Outback decided to give it a go with $6.99 combo meals and more 100% not-Australian dishes like Aussie Tacos.

9. THEY ONCE SOLD STEAK FLIGHTS.

For a fleeting few weeks back in 2013, Outback offered diners three 3-oz. steaks with a choice of four sauces. It sounds pretty fancy, until you learn that one of the sauces was called Creamy Diablo.

10. FLIGHT OF THE CONCHORDS' JEMAINE CLEMENT STARRED IN A SERIES OF ADS.

Never mind that Clement’s from New Zealand, not Australia— the ads are still pretty funny.


G'Day! 10 Facts About Outback Steakhouse

Don’t let the accent fool you: With its generously seasoned steaks, deep-fried shrimp platters, and sauce-drenched desserts, Outback Steakhouse’s cuisine is way more American than Australian. And most people seem to be okay with that. In 30 years time, Outback has gone from an underwhelming opening to become one of the most popular restaurant chains in America—a place where the Fosters is always flowing, and where you’ll likely find more than one boomerang stuck to the wall.

1. IT IS NOT, IN FACT, A TASTE OF THE OUTBACK.

You may be shocked to learn that a Bloomin' Onion is not a traditional dish of the Australian Outback. Nor are Aussie Fries or Alice Springs Chicken Quesadillas. But considering that real Outback cuisine includes bush tomatoes and wattleseed biscuits, you’re probably okay with that.

2. YOU CAN THANK CROCODILE DUNDEE.

Back in 1986, Paul Hogan introduced Americans to the image of Australians as rugged, carefree, and always carrying a big knife. Crocodile Dundee was the second most popular film in America that year, and created a cultural wave that Outback Steakhouse’s founders hoped to ride. In March 1988, they opened the first location in Tampa, Florida.

3. NONE OF THE FOUNDERS HAD EVER BEEN TO AUSTRALIA.

All three were veterans of the restaurant industry and wanted to invest in a novel concept. After developing the idea for Outback Steakhouse, a research trip was proposed and then quickly shot down. According to co-founder Chris Sullivan, they didn’t want to be influenced by the cuisine or otherwise put off their mission to deliver “American food and Australian fun.”

4. IT DID NOT HAVE A PROMISING START.

Opening day was as desolate as a sun-baked highway stretching to the horizon. Employees at the Tampa, Florida location had to park in the lot to make it look busy and call their friends and family and invite them to come in. To drum up business, the founders invested in ads and promotions, and eventually word got around.

5. NEW ORLEANS WAS A BIG INFLUENCE.

Co-founder Tim Gannon developed the Bloomin' Onion while working as a chef in New Orleans, using different spice combinations to season his deep-fried onion concoction. The 18 different seasonings used to marinate Outback’s steaks are also inspired by The Big Easy.

6. THERE'S ONLY ONE BLOOMIN' ONION.

Well, actually there are many—they just go by different names. There’s LongHorn Steakhouse’s Texas Rose, Chili’s Awesome Blossom (which was discontinued a few years back), and the thousands upon thousands of concoctions people create in their own kitchens using an at-home onion fryer. But only Outback's onions are crafted by "dedicated bloomologists."

7. THERE ACTUALLY ARE LOCATIONS IN AUSTRALIA.

Seven, to be exact, which means Australians must not find Outback Steakhouse completely offensive. There are subtle changes, like a menu that lists “prawns” instead of “shrimp,” and a grammatically incorrect tagline that exhorts diners to “Live Adventurous.”

8. THEY JUST STARTED SERVING LUNCH.

Lunch has traditionally been viewed as a money-loser in the restaurant industry, but that’s starting to change as fast-casual companies like Chipotle rake in the dough. So Outback decided to give it a go with $6.99 combo meals and more 100% not-Australian dishes like Aussie Tacos.

9. THEY ONCE SOLD STEAK FLIGHTS.

For a fleeting few weeks back in 2013, Outback offered diners three 3-oz. steaks with a choice of four sauces. It sounds pretty fancy, until you learn that one of the sauces was called Creamy Diablo.

10. FLIGHT OF THE CONCHORDS' JEMAINE CLEMENT STARRED IN A SERIES OF ADS.

Never mind that Clement’s from New Zealand, not Australia— the ads are still pretty funny.


G'Day! 10 Facts About Outback Steakhouse

Don’t let the accent fool you: With its generously seasoned steaks, deep-fried shrimp platters, and sauce-drenched desserts, Outback Steakhouse’s cuisine is way more American than Australian. And most people seem to be okay with that. In 30 years time, Outback has gone from an underwhelming opening to become one of the most popular restaurant chains in America—a place where the Fosters is always flowing, and where you’ll likely find more than one boomerang stuck to the wall.

1. IT IS NOT, IN FACT, A TASTE OF THE OUTBACK.

You may be shocked to learn that a Bloomin' Onion is not a traditional dish of the Australian Outback. Nor are Aussie Fries or Alice Springs Chicken Quesadillas. But considering that real Outback cuisine includes bush tomatoes and wattleseed biscuits, you’re probably okay with that.

2. YOU CAN THANK CROCODILE DUNDEE.

Back in 1986, Paul Hogan introduced Americans to the image of Australians as rugged, carefree, and always carrying a big knife. Crocodile Dundee was the second most popular film in America that year, and created a cultural wave that Outback Steakhouse’s founders hoped to ride. In March 1988, they opened the first location in Tampa, Florida.

3. NONE OF THE FOUNDERS HAD EVER BEEN TO AUSTRALIA.

All three were veterans of the restaurant industry and wanted to invest in a novel concept. After developing the idea for Outback Steakhouse, a research trip was proposed and then quickly shot down. According to co-founder Chris Sullivan, they didn’t want to be influenced by the cuisine or otherwise put off their mission to deliver “American food and Australian fun.”

4. IT DID NOT HAVE A PROMISING START.

Opening day was as desolate as a sun-baked highway stretching to the horizon. Employees at the Tampa, Florida location had to park in the lot to make it look busy and call their friends and family and invite them to come in. To drum up business, the founders invested in ads and promotions, and eventually word got around.

5. NEW ORLEANS WAS A BIG INFLUENCE.

Co-founder Tim Gannon developed the Bloomin' Onion while working as a chef in New Orleans, using different spice combinations to season his deep-fried onion concoction. The 18 different seasonings used to marinate Outback’s steaks are also inspired by The Big Easy.

6. THERE'S ONLY ONE BLOOMIN' ONION.

Well, actually there are many—they just go by different names. There’s LongHorn Steakhouse’s Texas Rose, Chili’s Awesome Blossom (which was discontinued a few years back), and the thousands upon thousands of concoctions people create in their own kitchens using an at-home onion fryer. But only Outback's onions are crafted by "dedicated bloomologists."

7. THERE ACTUALLY ARE LOCATIONS IN AUSTRALIA.

Seven, to be exact, which means Australians must not find Outback Steakhouse completely offensive. There are subtle changes, like a menu that lists “prawns” instead of “shrimp,” and a grammatically incorrect tagline that exhorts diners to “Live Adventurous.”

8. THEY JUST STARTED SERVING LUNCH.

Lunch has traditionally been viewed as a money-loser in the restaurant industry, but that’s starting to change as fast-casual companies like Chipotle rake in the dough. So Outback decided to give it a go with $6.99 combo meals and more 100% not-Australian dishes like Aussie Tacos.

9. THEY ONCE SOLD STEAK FLIGHTS.

For a fleeting few weeks back in 2013, Outback offered diners three 3-oz. steaks with a choice of four sauces. It sounds pretty fancy, until you learn that one of the sauces was called Creamy Diablo.

10. FLIGHT OF THE CONCHORDS' JEMAINE CLEMENT STARRED IN A SERIES OF ADS.

Never mind that Clement’s from New Zealand, not Australia— the ads are still pretty funny.


G'Day! 10 Facts About Outback Steakhouse

Don’t let the accent fool you: With its generously seasoned steaks, deep-fried shrimp platters, and sauce-drenched desserts, Outback Steakhouse’s cuisine is way more American than Australian. And most people seem to be okay with that. In 30 years time, Outback has gone from an underwhelming opening to become one of the most popular restaurant chains in America—a place where the Fosters is always flowing, and where you’ll likely find more than one boomerang stuck to the wall.

1. IT IS NOT, IN FACT, A TASTE OF THE OUTBACK.

You may be shocked to learn that a Bloomin' Onion is not a traditional dish of the Australian Outback. Nor are Aussie Fries or Alice Springs Chicken Quesadillas. But considering that real Outback cuisine includes bush tomatoes and wattleseed biscuits, you’re probably okay with that.

2. YOU CAN THANK CROCODILE DUNDEE.

Back in 1986, Paul Hogan introduced Americans to the image of Australians as rugged, carefree, and always carrying a big knife. Crocodile Dundee was the second most popular film in America that year, and created a cultural wave that Outback Steakhouse’s founders hoped to ride. In March 1988, they opened the first location in Tampa, Florida.

3. NONE OF THE FOUNDERS HAD EVER BEEN TO AUSTRALIA.

All three were veterans of the restaurant industry and wanted to invest in a novel concept. After developing the idea for Outback Steakhouse, a research trip was proposed and then quickly shot down. According to co-founder Chris Sullivan, they didn’t want to be influenced by the cuisine or otherwise put off their mission to deliver “American food and Australian fun.”

4. IT DID NOT HAVE A PROMISING START.

Opening day was as desolate as a sun-baked highway stretching to the horizon. Employees at the Tampa, Florida location had to park in the lot to make it look busy and call their friends and family and invite them to come in. To drum up business, the founders invested in ads and promotions, and eventually word got around.

5. NEW ORLEANS WAS A BIG INFLUENCE.

Co-founder Tim Gannon developed the Bloomin' Onion while working as a chef in New Orleans, using different spice combinations to season his deep-fried onion concoction. The 18 different seasonings used to marinate Outback’s steaks are also inspired by The Big Easy.

6. THERE'S ONLY ONE BLOOMIN' ONION.

Well, actually there are many—they just go by different names. There’s LongHorn Steakhouse’s Texas Rose, Chili’s Awesome Blossom (which was discontinued a few years back), and the thousands upon thousands of concoctions people create in their own kitchens using an at-home onion fryer. But only Outback's onions are crafted by "dedicated bloomologists."

7. THERE ACTUALLY ARE LOCATIONS IN AUSTRALIA.

Seven, to be exact, which means Australians must not find Outback Steakhouse completely offensive. There are subtle changes, like a menu that lists “prawns” instead of “shrimp,” and a grammatically incorrect tagline that exhorts diners to “Live Adventurous.”

8. THEY JUST STARTED SERVING LUNCH.

Lunch has traditionally been viewed as a money-loser in the restaurant industry, but that’s starting to change as fast-casual companies like Chipotle rake in the dough. So Outback decided to give it a go with $6.99 combo meals and more 100% not-Australian dishes like Aussie Tacos.

9. THEY ONCE SOLD STEAK FLIGHTS.

For a fleeting few weeks back in 2013, Outback offered diners three 3-oz. steaks with a choice of four sauces. It sounds pretty fancy, until you learn that one of the sauces was called Creamy Diablo.

10. FLIGHT OF THE CONCHORDS' JEMAINE CLEMENT STARRED IN A SERIES OF ADS.

Never mind that Clement’s from New Zealand, not Australia— the ads are still pretty funny.


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