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Polenta with fried eggs recipe

Polenta with fried eggs recipe



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  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Breakfast
  • Brunch

A very quick and tasty idea for a filling vegetarian brunch dish. You can find blocks of ready made polenta in most large supermarkets.

1 person made this

IngredientsServes: 4

  • 2 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 (500g) block of ready made polenta, sliced into 8 thick slices
  • 4 eggs
  • 1 pinch of salt

MethodPrep:5min ›Cook:10min ›Ready in:15min

  1. Heat oil in a large non-stick frying pan over medium-low heat.
  2. Arrange the slices of polenta in the pan. Cook slices on one side until golden brown, about 4 or 5 minutes; flip the slices over and brown them on the other side for another 4 or 5 minutes. Remove polenta slices from pan with a spatula onto a plate; cover with foil to keep warm.
  3. Lower the heat, crack the eggs into the pan; season with salt and cover pan with a lid. Cook eggs for 1 or 2 minutes, until the egg whites are firmed.
  4. Place 2 polenta slices on 4 serving plates; top with fried egg.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(2)


Recipe: Polenta With Fried Eggs

Golden polenta makes a wonderful breakfast drizzled with maple syrup and melted butter. Top it with a fried egg, and the yolk becomes a velvety sauce for a dinner-worthy meal. Use coarsely ground cornmeal or try hominy grits that, like hominy, have been nixtamalized. Slightly moister than cornmeal, hominy grits have a nuanced, tangy flavor. Please avoid instant polenta or the precooked packaged polenta it just doesn’t taste as good.//Polenta doesn’t require much skill, just a lot of patience. If you prepare it for dinner, you’ll have the makings of a luscious breakfast the next day.

Ingredients

Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper

Fresh thyme leaves for garnish

Instructions

To make the polenta, bring the water to a boil in a 3-quart heavy saucepan. Slowly whisk in the polenta and salt, reduce the heat, and cook at a simmer, uncovered, stirring the polenta about every 10 minutes until it’s thick and no longer tastes raw, about 45 minutes. Remove from the heat. Scoop the polenta onto individual plates.To fry the eggs, set a medium skillet over medium heat and melt the butter. Break the eggs and slip into the pan. Reduce the heat to low and cook slowly until the white is set and the yolks begin to thicken but do not become hard. Using a spatula, gently lift the eggs onto the polenta and season to taste with salt and peppergarnish with fresh thyme. Serve right away!

*This will yield 4 cups of cooked polenta. Store extra in a covered bowl in the refrigerator for up to 3 days or freeze. To reheat, turn into a pot and set over low heat. Add a little water or milk to loosen the consistency, and stir to warm through. You may use a mix of fine and coarse ground polenta fora variety of textures.*


Guest Recipe of the Month: Fried Eggs & Frico with Polenta

½ cup cheddar cheese (shredded)
½ cup Parmesan cheese (grated)
½ cup cooked polenta
1-2 tablespoons olive oil + more as needed
1 teaspoon garlic (minced)
2 large eggs (cage free)
2 cups torn greens (kale, chard, collard)
Sea salt & pepper to season

Heat a large skillet over medium heat. Add a tablespoon of olive oil and the garlic. Cook for 1 minute.

Combine the cheeses together and assemble two separate circles of cheese in the skillet. Cook for about 2 minutes, until the mounds melt into rounds.

Evenly spread the polenta over the cheese fricos and drizzle with olive oil.
Crack an egg over each mound and season with salt and pepper.

Make a wreath around the pan with greens. Add more olive oil if needed.
Cook until greens are wilted and egg is set.

Transfer to a plate
Enjoy!

About Laurie Conrad:

Anyone who has had a class with me, knows that I keep things lighthearted, fun, and educational. For those of you, who have not had the opportunity present itself yet, allow me to introduce myself. My name is Laurie Conrad and I am a private instructor through my business The Blue Daisy.

It wasn’t until college that I was really able to appreciate and understand the importance of gastronomy. Struggling to find a 3 credit class in-between 5 credit Organic Chemistry and Physics classes, I stumbled upon a Food Science class, which changed my outlook forever. This course encompassed everything from the history of salt, to why bread rises, and who has the taste buds to taste cilantro. The information given to me as a student, I pass on to you when you attend a class of mine. Knowing what I know, I am willing to pay that crazy price for a jar of salt or jam, because sometimes ingredients are hard to come by or the labor of love it takes to produce it is equally as worthy.

After school, I worked in the medical field, but soon returned to my passion of cooking. I was the resident chef for Williams Sonoma and was an instructor for Whole Foods to name a few. As luck would have it, I was fortunate to connect with Janice Thomas from the Savory Spoon after both a hilarious and disastrous cooking class she attended. From that point on, I have been with her ever since. That was close to 15 years ago, WOW!!

All chefs really try to embrace local, organic as often, and flavorful dishes. What sets me apart from my colleagues is the skillset and knowledge I bring to class. Everything from the anatomy of knives, to the history of the chickens.

Over the last few years, I have been raising different breeds of chickens. Nothing beats cage free farm fresh eggs! And no different than us, what we eat, and how we live is what determines the quality of an egg.

Please enjoy the following recipe and some photos of my girls. I look forward to teaching classes at The Savory Spoon and hope you have the chance to attend one of mine or any of the other amazing classes.
Cheers,
Laurie


Polenta, Fried Eggs, Greens and Blistered Tomatoes

Swap eggs and toast for this creative dish, featuring creamy polenta topped with fried eggs, sautéed greens and cherry tomatoes cooked until they burst. It hits the spot for weekend brunch, but it makes an equally delicious quick dinner.

Polenta, Fried Eggs, Greens and Blistered Tomatoes

2 to 2 1/2 cups water (depending on cooking method)

1/2 cup gluten-free medium-grind cornmeal, such as Bob’s Red Mill

1/2 tsp. kosher salt, plus more, to taste

Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

2 to 4 Tbs. grated Parmigiano-Reggiano or pecorino romano cheese (optional)

1 Tbs. chopped fresh thyme

2 cups cherry or grape tomatoes

Pinch of red pepper flakes

1 large bunch Swiss chard, stems removed, leaves chopped

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

To make the polenta in a microwave, in a microwavable bowl, stir together 2 cups water, the cornmeal, olive oil, the 1/2 tsp. salt and a generous amount of pepper. Place in the microwave and cook at the high setting for 5 minutes. Stir thoroughly, then return to the microwave and cook at the high setting for 5 minutes more. Stir well. Stir in the cheese and thyme, and adjust the seasoning with salt and pepper.

To make the polenta on the stovetop, in a heavy saucepan, combine 2 1/2 cups water, the olive oil, the 1/2 tsp. salt and a generous amount of black pepper. Bring to a boil over high heat, then gradually whisk in the cornmeal. Return the mixture to a boil, stirring frequently. Reduce the heat to low and simmer slowly, stirring frequently, until the polenta is thick, about 18 minutes. Stir in the cheese and thyme, and adjust the seasoning with salt and black pepper.

Meanwhile, in a large nonstick fry pan over medium-high heat, warm the olive oil. Add the tomatoes and cook, stirring occasionally, until blistered, about 4 minutes. Transfer to a bowl.

Add the onion and red pepper flakes to the pan and sauté for 1 minute to soften slightly. Add the chard, season with salt and black pepper, and stir for 1 minute to coat with the oil. Add the water and cook, stirring frequently, until the chard is tender, about 5 minutes. Return the tomatoes to the pan and stir for 1 minute to warm. Reduce the heat to medium-low.

Using a wooden spoon, make 4 indentations in the mixture. Break an egg into each indentation and season with salt and black pepper. Cover the pan and cook until the egg whites are set, about 4 minutes.

Divide the polenta between 2 warmed plates, spreading it over the center of the plates in a circle. Use a spatula to transfer the eggs and vegetables around them to the plates, arranging atop the polenta. Serve immediately. Serves 2.

/>Find more quick, gluten-free dinner recipes in our book Weeknight Gluten Free, by Kristine Kidd.


Recipe: Morning Polenta With Fried Eggs

Note: This will yield 4 cups of cooked polenta. Store extra in a covered bowl in the refrigerator for up to 3 days, or freeze. To reheat, turn into a pot and set over low heat. Add a little water or milk to loosen the consistency and stir to warm through. Make it the night before so you’re ready for a quick meal in the morning. From Beth Dooley.

• Chopped fresh thyme leaves, for garnish

To make the polenta: Bring 4 cups water to a boil in a 3-quart heavy saucepan. Slowly whisk in the polenta and a generous pinch of salt, lower the heat, and cook at a simmer, stirring the polenta with a long spoon about every 10 minutes until it’s thick and no longer tastes raw, about 45 minutes. Remove from the heat. Scoop out the polenta onto a plate or into a bowl.

To fry the eggs: Set a large skillet over medium heat and melt the butter. Break the eggs and slip them into the pan. Reduce the heat to low and cook slowly until the whites are set and the yolks begin to thicken but are not hard. Gently lift the eggs onto the polenta and season to taste with salt and pepper and garnish with fresh thyme. Serve immediately.


Peperonata & Fried Eggs

It’s bell pepper season! Though these colorful vegetables are available year-round, they’re at their best and brightest from late summer to early fall. In this dish, you’ll take advantage of the harvest and make peperonata, a traditional Italian dish. It’s a simple, versatile preparation that lets the peppers truly shine. In our version, you’ll be using not only the standard red bells, but also an heirloom variety to add color and deepen the flavor.

Title

Wash and dry the fresh produce. In a medium pot, heat 3½ cups of salted water to boiling on high. Remove the stems, seeds and ribs of the bell and heirloom peppers slice all 3 peppers into thin strips. Peel and slice the garlic and onion. Pick the parsley leaves off the stems discard the stems and finely chop the leaves.

In a medium pan (nonstick, if you have one), heat 2 teaspoons of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the peppers, onions and garlic season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, 4 to 6 minutes, or until the vegetables are slightly browned. Reduce the heat to medium and cook, stirring occasionally, 14 to 16 minutes, or until the vegetables are completely softened.

While the peppers cook and once the water is boiling, slowly stir in the polenta. Continue stirring to break up any lumps. Reduce the heat to low and simmer, stirring frequently, 10 to 12 minutes, or until thickened. Remove from heat and stir in the butter and Parmesan cheese. Season with salt to taste and mix thoroughly to combine. Set aside in a warm place as you continue cooking.

Increase the heat under the pan of vegetables to medium-high and add the tomato paste season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring frequently, 1 to 3 minutes, or until the tomato paste is fragrant and turns a dark red color. Add the sherry vinegar and ¼ cup of water cook 1 to 2 minutes, or until most of the liquid is absorbed. Season with salt and pepper to taste transfer to a bowl. Loosely cover with aluminum foil to keep warm. Wipe out the pan.

In the same pan used to cook the vegetables, heat 2 teaspoons of olive oil on medium until hot. Crack the eggs into the pan season with salt and pepper. Cook 1 to 3 minutes, or until the whites are cooked, but the yolks are still runny (or to your desired degree of doneness). Remove the pan from heat.

Stir all but a pinch of the parsley into the peperonata. Divide the cooked polenta and finished peperonata between 2 dishes. Top each with a fried egg. Garnish with the remaining parsley. Enjoy!

Tips from Home Chefs

About Blue Apron

Blue Apron delivers original, step-by-step recipes and fresh ingredients to customers nationwide. Our menus change every week, so with each delivery you learn to cook inventive new dishes with seasonal ingredients. By letting us source these hard-to-find ingredients for you, you'll get food that is fresher and cheaper than you can get at your local supermarket, and there's no waste because we only send you what you need for each recipe.

We named our company &ldquoBlue Apron&rdquo because chefs around the world wear blue aprons when they're learning to cook, and it has become a symbol of lifelong learning in cooking. We believe you're never done learning in the kitchen, so we design our menus to ensure you're always learning new cooking techniques, trying new cuisines, and using unique ingredients.

Blue Apron is a weekly subscription service with no commitment - you can skip a week or cancel at any time with a week's notice. We can't wait to cook with you!

Wash and dry the fresh produce. In a medium pot, heat 3½ cups of salted water to boiling on high. Remove the stems, seeds and ribs of the bell and heirloom peppers slice all 3 peppers into thin strips. Peel and slice the garlic and onion. Pick the parsley leaves off the stems discard the stems and finely chop the leaves.

In a medium pan (nonstick, if you have one), heat 2 teaspoons of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the peppers, onions and garlic season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, 4 to 6 minutes, or until the vegetables are slightly browned. Reduce the heat to medium and cook, stirring occasionally, 14 to 16 minutes, or until the vegetables are completely softened.

While the peppers cook and once the water is boiling, slowly stir in the polenta. Continue stirring to break up any lumps. Reduce the heat to low and simmer, stirring frequently, 10 to 12 minutes, or until thickened. Remove from heat and stir in the butter and Parmesan cheese. Season with salt to taste and mix thoroughly to combine. Set aside in a warm place as you continue cooking.

Increase the heat under the pan of vegetables to medium-high and add the tomato paste season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring frequently, 1 to 3 minutes, or until the tomato paste is fragrant and turns a dark red color. Add the sherry vinegar and ¼ cup of water cook 1 to 2 minutes, or until most of the liquid is absorbed. Season with salt and pepper to taste transfer to a bowl. Loosely cover with aluminum foil to keep warm. Wipe out the pan.

In the same pan used to cook the vegetables, heat 2 teaspoons of olive oil on medium until hot. Crack the eggs into the pan season with salt and pepper. Cook 1 to 3 minutes, or until the whites are cooked, but the yolks are still runny (or to your desired degree of doneness). Remove the pan from heat.

Stir all but a pinch of the parsley into the peperonata. Divide the cooked polenta and finished peperonata between 2 dishes. Top each with a fried egg. Garnish with the remaining parsley. Enjoy!


Baked Polenta & Eggs

To add even more flavor in our comforting polenta, we’re finishing it with tangy parmesan cheese—creating the perfect, pillowy base for savory kale, mushrooms, and eggs that get baked in the oven until all the flavors deliciously meld together.
CLICK FOR RECIPE CARD

Please note nutritional information, including ingredients and allergens, may differ from above based on your location. Location-specific nutritional information is available for viewing upon subscribing, or by logging in if you are already a subscriber.

Title

Place an oven rack in the center of the oven preheat to 450°F. In a medium pot, heat 2 cups water and a big pinch of salt to boiling on high. Wash and dry the fresh produce. Cut the mushrooms into bite-sized pieces. Peel and roughly chop 2 cloves of garlic. Separate the kale leaves from the stems discard the stems, then roughly chop the leaves. Grate the fontina on the large side of a box grater. Pick the sage leaves off the stems.

Add the polenta to the pot of boiling water whisk to thoroughly combine. Reduce the heat to medium and cook, whisking constantly to prevent lumps from forming, 3 to 5 minutes, or until the polenta is thickened. Turn off the heat. Season with salt and pepper. Stir in the parmesan until melted and combined. Taste, then season with salt and pepper if desired. Transfer to a small baking dish spread into an even layer.

In a large pan (nonstick, if you have one), heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the mushroom pieces in an even layer. Cook, without stirring, 3 to 4 minutes, or until browned. Add the chopped garlic and as much of the red pepper flakes as you'd like, depending on how spicy you'd like the dish to be season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring frequently, 1 to 2 minutes, or until combined and slightly softened. Add the chopped kale season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring frequently, 2 to 3 minutes, or until slightly wilted. Add 1/4 cup of water (carefully, as the liquid may splatter). Cook, stirring frequently, 2 to 3 minutes, or until the water has cooked off. Turn off the heat carefully stir in the vinegar. Taste, then season with salt and pepper if desired.

To the baking dish of cooked polenta, add the cooked vegetables in an even layer, leaving 2 shallow wells for the eggs. Carefully crack an egg into each well season with salt and pepper. Evenly top with the grated fontina. Bake 11 to 13 minutes, or until the egg whites are set and the yolks are cooked to your desired degree of doneness. Remove from the oven and let stand at least 2 minutes.

Meanwhile, rinse and wipe out the pan used to cook the vegetables. In the same pan, heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the sage leaves in an even layer and cook, stirring occasionally, 1 to 2 minutes, or until dark green and crispy. Carefully transfer to a paper towel-lined plate immediately season with salt. Serve the baked polenta and eggs topped with the fried sage. Enjoy!

Tips from Home Chefs

About Blue Apron

Blue Apron delivers original, step-by-step recipes and fresh ingredients to customers nationwide. Our menus change every week, so with each delivery you learn to cook inventive new dishes with seasonal ingredients. By letting us source these hard-to-find ingredients for you, you'll get food that is fresher and cheaper than you can get at your local supermarket, and there's no waste because we only send you what you need for each recipe.

We named our company &ldquoBlue Apron&rdquo because chefs around the world wear blue aprons when they're learning to cook, and it has become a symbol of lifelong learning in cooking. We believe you're never done learning in the kitchen, so we design our menus to ensure you're always learning new cooking techniques, trying new cuisines, and using unique ingredients.

Blue Apron is a weekly subscription service with no commitment - you can skip a week or cancel at any time with a week's notice. We can't wait to cook with you!

Place an oven rack in the center of the oven preheat to 450°F. In a medium pot, heat 2 cups water and a big pinch of salt to boiling on high. Wash and dry the fresh produce. Cut the mushrooms into bite-sized pieces. Peel and roughly chop 2 cloves of garlic. Separate the kale leaves from the stems discard the stems, then roughly chop the leaves. Grate the fontina on the large side of a box grater. Pick the sage leaves off the stems.

Add the polenta to the pot of boiling water whisk to thoroughly combine. Reduce the heat to medium and cook, whisking constantly to prevent lumps from forming, 3 to 5 minutes, or until the polenta is thickened. Turn off the heat. Season with salt and pepper. Stir in the parmesan until melted and combined. Taste, then season with salt and pepper if desired. Transfer to a small baking dish spread into an even layer.

In a large pan (nonstick, if you have one), heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the mushroom pieces in an even layer. Cook, without stirring, 3 to 4 minutes, or until browned. Add the chopped garlic and as much of the red pepper flakes as you'd like, depending on how spicy you'd like the dish to be season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring frequently, 1 to 2 minutes, or until combined and slightly softened. Add the chopped kale season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring frequently, 2 to 3 minutes, or until slightly wilted. Add 1/4 cup of water (carefully, as the liquid may splatter). Cook, stirring frequently, 2 to 3 minutes, or until the water has cooked off. Turn off the heat carefully stir in the vinegar. Taste, then season with salt and pepper if desired.

To the baking dish of cooked polenta, add the cooked vegetables in an even layer, leaving 2 shallow wells for the eggs. Carefully crack an egg into each well season with salt and pepper. Evenly top with the grated fontina. Bake 11 to 13 minutes, or until the egg whites are set and the yolks are cooked to your desired degree of doneness. Remove from the oven and let stand at least 2 minutes.

Meanwhile, rinse and wipe out the pan used to cook the vegetables. In the same pan, heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the sage leaves in an even layer and cook, stirring occasionally, 1 to 2 minutes, or until dark green and crispy. Carefully transfer to a paper towel-lined plate immediately season with salt. Serve the baked polenta and eggs topped with the fried sage. Enjoy!


Polenta with fried eggs recipe - Recipes


[1] Comfort food: warm, creamy polenta topped with a fried egg and sautéed cherry tomatoes (photo © Good Eggs).


[2] Cherry tomatoes are sauteed into a jammy sauce, called “burst tomatoes” (photo © Barilla).


[3] Buy a box of polenta. You can use it at any meal of the day (photo © Delallo).

When was the last time you made polenta?

It’s such a warming comfort food, we’re surprised that we don’t make it more often. And it’s gluten-free*.

So for brunch this weekend, we’re making this yummy recipe from Good Eggs.


WHAT IS POLENTA

Polenta—which is both the Italian word for cornmeal and a cooked dish made from it—has become familiar in America through Italian and Continental restaurants.

But it’s not new to America. For the first two centuries on the continent, American diets contained much cornmeal: in bread, as breakfast porridge, as a side starch, and in other recipes.

Paradoxically, corn, which is native to the Americas, was shipped to Europe, where Italians turned it into polenta.

Back in the Americas, except for the Southern region, cornmeal was gradually replaced in American diets by refined wheat flour (note that while corn is a whole grain, milled polenta is not).


RECIPE: FRIED EGGS & POLENTA WITH BURST CHERRY TOMATOES

As with oatmeal, you can find instant polenta as well as long-cooking polenta.

You can also take a shortcut with this recipe by purchasing ready-made polenta in a roll form, and cooking slices instead of making porridge-style polenta from scratch.

Ingredients For 3 Servings


For The Basil Butter

Preparation

1. MAKE the basil butter. In a small bowl, combine the ingredients and beat on medium-low speed until combined. Set aside. (You can make this a few days in advance and wrap tightly in the fridge, until you’re ready to soften it.)

1. BRING 3 cups water and a pinch of salt to a simmer in a small pot.

2. COMBINE in a bowl, 1 cup polenta, 1 cup milk or water, and a pinch of salt. Let it soak. When the water is simmering, whisk in the polenta, along with the soaking liquid. Turn down the heat to low, cover, and simmer until tender, stirring occasionally, about 10 minutes. Remove from the heat and whisk in 1 tablespoon olive oil and 1 teaspoon salt. Meanwhile…

3. REMOVE the tops from the tomatoes. Slice the shallot and chop the garlic. Set the basil butter on the counter, and let it come to room temperature.

4. WARM 1 tablespoon olive oil in a nonstick frying pan over medium heat. Add the shallot and sauté until soft, 2 minutes. Add the garlic and stir until fragrant, 30 seconds. Transfer to a bowl.

5. RETURN the pan to the heat, and add the tomatoes. Sauté until the tomatoes burst, sink down, and start to turn jammy, 10 minutes.

6. RETURN the shallot and garlic to the pan, add 1 tablespoon of the basil butter, and stir until melted. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Transfer to the bowl and set aside and keep warm.

7. WIPE out the pan, return it to the heat, and warm 1 tablespoon olive oil. Crack 3 eggs into the pan and fry until the whites are set but the yolks are still runny, about 3 minutes for sunny-side up.

8. SPOON the polenta into bowls, dollop with the basil butter, and swirl to melt. Add the cherry tomatoes, and slide the fried eggs on top. Sprinkle with the cheese, grind with pepper, and serve.

*Polenta is naturally gluten-free (the only grains that do naturally contain gluten are barley, rye and wheat). Since so many other grains are processed in facilities that also handle these latter grains, however, some varieties of polenta may become contaminated with trace amounts of gluten. Some brands of polenta print “gluten-free” directly onto their product labels for easy identification. Others don’t.


Polenta With Fontina and Eggs — Meatless Monday

Similar to Southern-style grits, traditional Italian polenta is made from dried corn and churns out rich and creamy results after simmering for a while in liquid, often water or stock. Many classic recipes feature a how-to for making polenta from scratch, but the process can be challenging to tackle on a hectic weeknight. Luckily, most grocery stores now sell prepared polenta in firm, chilled tubes, and these go-to conveniences make easy time-savers when you're in a hurry.

Food Network Magazine relies on premade polenta to prepare its simple recipe for Polenta With Fontina and Eggs (pictured above) in only 40 minutes. After making a basic tomato sauce with garlic and a pinch of red pepper flakes, add sliced, seared polenta discs to the same pan, crack some eggs on top and finish with grated fontina cheese. Just a few minutes in the oven is all it takes to set the eggs and melt the cheese, delivering a hearty, one-skillet supper that the whole family will enjoy.

If you've never before dabbled in homemade polenta and have time to experiment, try Giada's easy recipe for Fried Polenta, which starts with a batch of her Basic Polenta. She cooks cornmeal in water until it's soft and creamy, then refrigerates it until firm and cuts it into sticks. Each slice is pan-fried before being showered with nutty Parmesan cheese and salt. Treat these golden-brown beauties as you would mozzarella sticks by serving them with your favorite marinara sauce for easy, delicious dunking.

Meatless Monday, an international movement, encourages people everywhere to cut meat one day a week for personal and planetary health. Browse more meat-free recipes.


Fried Polenta, Avocado, & Poached Egg Breakfast (plus, KALE!)

I’ve kind of been ignoring the internet. I’ve also kind of been ignoring real life. Where does that leave me? Um, non-existant? Kinda.

I spent all of last week moving. MOVING. You guys know my feelings on moving (read: not the warmest). You also know my standpoint on roommates (read: not even close to warm)… but now I’m living in a beautiful old Portland home with a few roommates who appear to be great! By that I mean I’ve spent one night here and don’t know them at all and have barely interacted. So far so good?

Really though, I think they’ll be great. Mostly I just feel like I’ve given up on my hardcore anti-roomie stance, mostly for the sake of being financially reasonable/responsible. And, now I live in a home! With a yard! And a kitchen bigger than my entire old apartment! I guess, if I can swallow the end of my solitary living, it’s a good move. So now I’m 80% unpacked in my ROOM (aiiiiii! try to imagine going from having a 2 bedroom house full of stuff, to living in a small apartment, to living in a ROOM, all within 1.5 years. There has been some SERIOUS downsizing!), and at that point where I’m not sure how to finish! I got to that point on Thursday, at which point I was like “OK BYE!” and headed up to Seattle for the weekend. Smart, right? Right.

All this to say: sorry for being MIA. I took DAYS away from instagram and snapchat (a weird/unusual/probably healthy thing for me). I haven’t cooked more than cheesy toast in almost two weeks. I DO plan to be here! With Thanksgiving next week, things might be sparse. Don’t forget that I love you all!! I’m here. AND I’m here with another bomb.com breakfast made of leftovers and healthy ish!

This came from having leftover polenta from this dish. If you ever have leftover polenta, take my advice and immediately pour it into a baking sheet or something that will leave you with a thin layer — PERFECT for frying up the next morning for breakfast. YES and YES.

So, this one used my herby/cheesy polenta — you can use whatever polenta you want. You just have to make it ahead of time so it has time to solidify! Then, top it with some smooshed avocado — it’s like avocado toast but ON POLENTA! Then, use your magical egg-poaching skills (I’ve been showing mine off for the last month as much as possible, which 99% of the time means only for myself and snapchat) and poach an egg to go on top. Also, chop up some kale! Massage it for a minute! Douse it in oil/balsamic! Obviously we’re putting some fresh parm on that. Really though, this is a recipe that isn’t really a recipe. Do whatever the heck you want! Hopefully I’ve inspired you to do something scrumptious.

Have a lovely week! I’ll be back with more tales of roommates and moving and figuring my life out (oy. so much on that topic, right!?). xoxo


Watch the video: Gordon Ramsays Grilled Polenta with Tomatoes and Goats Curd