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How to Start a Wine Cellar

How to Start a Wine Cellar


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So you love to cook and you love wine, but don't have a wine cellar. Except now you find yourself with a little extra cash, or maybe you're tired of not having the right wine when you need it, or you've just moved in with someone to share a bottle with at dinner and it's time to finally start that cellar.

Here's the beginning strategy: Buy a mixed case of 12 bottles to cover all possibilities. Spend less than $20 a bottle and ask for a mixed-case discount — you're shooting for between $150 and $200 total. Select a wine for each cooking or entertaining need.

Take this list to your friendly neighborhood wine shop and ask for some assistance (and the discount):

For celebrations or with appetizers: a sparkling wine such as a brut (dry) cava from Spain.

Simply-prepared shellfish and grilled white fish: light, crisp white such as a Muscadet from the Loire Valley.

Salmon and meatier fish: a lighter Pinot Noir from Oregon or Sonoma.

Chicken salad or pasta with white sauce: Sauvignon Blanc that isn't too vegetal.

Poultry and cream sauces: Chardonnay from California or the south of France.

Pasta with red sauce: Barbera (fruitier) or Sangiovese (leaner, citrusy) from Italy.

Spicy Asian dishes: Riesling with just a touch of sweetness.

Hamburgers and steak: Cabernet Sauvignon from Chile, Meritage (Bordeaux blend) from California, or Malbec from Argentina.

Stews, chili, and root vegetables: an earthier red such as a Syrah-based blend from California or France.

Lamb: less-fruity Merlot from France, ideally from one of the more-affordable areas of Bordeaux.

Cheeses: Port is an idea wine for most bleus and cow's milk cheeses, but if that has too much alcohol for you (20%) or costs too much, buy a fruity (but not nouveau!) Beaujolais.

Light desserts: late-harvest white (sweeter grapes) that has good acidity to pair with ripe fruit, fruit tarts, and other pastry finishers.

Bam! You have a starter wine cellar. Be sure to keep it in a cool closet away from high heat if you don't have a basement. Also, two keys to building a new wine collection: One, buy more than you drink, so grab a couple for every bottle that disappears, and two, don't get in the trap of only purchasing your favorite wine. You need the variety for your cooking moods and entertainment needs.

Vegetarian? The same principles apply — choose different wines according to the cooking method (sauté, bake, boil), the sauce you use (tomato, cream, cheese, or soy), and the spices you prefer (from Provence dry to curry spicy).

Case — a mixed one — closed!


The Gentleman’s Cellar: How to Start a Wine Cellar

Few experiences will overwhelm the senses with romantic anticipation like opening a bottle of old wine. It is the reason for wine&rsquos greatness in the world of beverages. The older the wine is, the greater the anticipation, and along with it the realities which are equally high and low: the disenfranchised regret of the bad ones, and the sensory ecstasy of the great ones. Old wines can become marker stones in the days that fly by and blur together. Through our wine cellars we are able to chronicle who we are and where we&rsquove been. Remember the night we drank the 2001 Von Schubert Kabinett? As clearly as if it were yesterday &ndash by closing my eyes I can still smell and taste every part of the wine. The moral of the story is that if you don&rsquot yet have a wine cellar, even a modest one, today is the day to start one.

The market has provided us with wine fridges of all shapes, sizes and prices. If you&rsquore lucky and can afford one, buy the biggest one you have a space for (or don&rsquot find to be obnoxious). If you don&rsquot want to go the wine fridge route, you may be even luckier. You get to create you cellar organically from wooden or cardboard boxes. You should put these boxes in the place with not necessarily the lowest temperature, but the most consistent. My wine sits in a corner in the basement, where the temperature fluctuates from 14 to 19 Celcius throughout the year.

You should put a little thought into how big you&rsquod like your cellar to get, and there&rsquos a way to calculate that number precisely. Add up how many aged wines you would like to drink every year, and multiply that number by how long sounds like a good time to age wine for you. For me that number is about 12 cases: 8-10 bottles per year and I like the idea of pulling out a 15-20 year old bottle. I started by buying a mixed case of 12 bottles that contained some of my favourite wines and some that I felt had labels that looked traditional and belonged in a wine cellar. Price was all over the map. Masi&rsquos Campofiorin was definitely in that first case. Try to shed the intimidation of not knowing what you&rsquore buying and rely on your instincts. Even the wine store owner likely doesn&rsquot have a full grasp on every wine in the store the adventure is the point of the wine cellar in the first place.

At first you will be your wine cellars&rsquo own worst enemy. The temptation is to immediately draw wine from the box, especially when you need a bottle in a pinch and you know it&rsquos there, or even worse when you&rsquore already a bottle down and get loose and curious. Buy a few extra bottles on top of the first 12 to give yourself insurance. Tape the box shut for at least 6 months. Much like a golfer who realizes that you feel the same about your game even if you improve 10 shots, the first lesson in wine aging is learning to not worry about when is the perfect time to drink the wine. 15 year old Yellow Tail may not taste good but it will taste interesting. Freshly bottled Bordeaux will leave your mouth dry with tannin but will leave an impression of its future greatness. There&rsquos no such thing as drinking wine on the perfect day of its apogee. Or as one wine writer put it, there are no great wines only great bottles.


The Gentleman’s Cellar: How to Start a Wine Cellar

Few experiences will overwhelm the senses with romantic anticipation like opening a bottle of old wine. It is the reason for wine&rsquos greatness in the world of beverages. The older the wine is, the greater the anticipation, and along with it the realities which are equally high and low: the disenfranchised regret of the bad ones, and the sensory ecstasy of the great ones. Old wines can become marker stones in the days that fly by and blur together. Through our wine cellars we are able to chronicle who we are and where we&rsquove been. Remember the night we drank the 2001 Von Schubert Kabinett? As clearly as if it were yesterday &ndash by closing my eyes I can still smell and taste every part of the wine. The moral of the story is that if you don&rsquot yet have a wine cellar, even a modest one, today is the day to start one.

The market has provided us with wine fridges of all shapes, sizes and prices. If you&rsquore lucky and can afford one, buy the biggest one you have a space for (or don&rsquot find to be obnoxious). If you don&rsquot want to go the wine fridge route, you may be even luckier. You get to create you cellar organically from wooden or cardboard boxes. You should put these boxes in the place with not necessarily the lowest temperature, but the most consistent. My wine sits in a corner in the basement, where the temperature fluctuates from 14 to 19 Celcius throughout the year.

You should put a little thought into how big you&rsquod like your cellar to get, and there&rsquos a way to calculate that number precisely. Add up how many aged wines you would like to drink every year, and multiply that number by how long sounds like a good time to age wine for you. For me that number is about 12 cases: 8-10 bottles per year and I like the idea of pulling out a 15-20 year old bottle. I started by buying a mixed case of 12 bottles that contained some of my favourite wines and some that I felt had labels that looked traditional and belonged in a wine cellar. Price was all over the map. Masi&rsquos Campofiorin was definitely in that first case. Try to shed the intimidation of not knowing what you&rsquore buying and rely on your instincts. Even the wine store owner likely doesn&rsquot have a full grasp on every wine in the store the adventure is the point of the wine cellar in the first place.

At first you will be your wine cellars&rsquo own worst enemy. The temptation is to immediately draw wine from the box, especially when you need a bottle in a pinch and you know it&rsquos there, or even worse when you&rsquore already a bottle down and get loose and curious. Buy a few extra bottles on top of the first 12 to give yourself insurance. Tape the box shut for at least 6 months. Much like a golfer who realizes that you feel the same about your game even if you improve 10 shots, the first lesson in wine aging is learning to not worry about when is the perfect time to drink the wine. 15 year old Yellow Tail may not taste good but it will taste interesting. Freshly bottled Bordeaux will leave your mouth dry with tannin but will leave an impression of its future greatness. There&rsquos no such thing as drinking wine on the perfect day of its apogee. Or as one wine writer put it, there are no great wines only great bottles.


The Gentleman’s Cellar: How to Start a Wine Cellar

Few experiences will overwhelm the senses with romantic anticipation like opening a bottle of old wine. It is the reason for wine&rsquos greatness in the world of beverages. The older the wine is, the greater the anticipation, and along with it the realities which are equally high and low: the disenfranchised regret of the bad ones, and the sensory ecstasy of the great ones. Old wines can become marker stones in the days that fly by and blur together. Through our wine cellars we are able to chronicle who we are and where we&rsquove been. Remember the night we drank the 2001 Von Schubert Kabinett? As clearly as if it were yesterday &ndash by closing my eyes I can still smell and taste every part of the wine. The moral of the story is that if you don&rsquot yet have a wine cellar, even a modest one, today is the day to start one.

The market has provided us with wine fridges of all shapes, sizes and prices. If you&rsquore lucky and can afford one, buy the biggest one you have a space for (or don&rsquot find to be obnoxious). If you don&rsquot want to go the wine fridge route, you may be even luckier. You get to create you cellar organically from wooden or cardboard boxes. You should put these boxes in the place with not necessarily the lowest temperature, but the most consistent. My wine sits in a corner in the basement, where the temperature fluctuates from 14 to 19 Celcius throughout the year.

You should put a little thought into how big you&rsquod like your cellar to get, and there&rsquos a way to calculate that number precisely. Add up how many aged wines you would like to drink every year, and multiply that number by how long sounds like a good time to age wine for you. For me that number is about 12 cases: 8-10 bottles per year and I like the idea of pulling out a 15-20 year old bottle. I started by buying a mixed case of 12 bottles that contained some of my favourite wines and some that I felt had labels that looked traditional and belonged in a wine cellar. Price was all over the map. Masi&rsquos Campofiorin was definitely in that first case. Try to shed the intimidation of not knowing what you&rsquore buying and rely on your instincts. Even the wine store owner likely doesn&rsquot have a full grasp on every wine in the store the adventure is the point of the wine cellar in the first place.

At first you will be your wine cellars&rsquo own worst enemy. The temptation is to immediately draw wine from the box, especially when you need a bottle in a pinch and you know it&rsquos there, or even worse when you&rsquore already a bottle down and get loose and curious. Buy a few extra bottles on top of the first 12 to give yourself insurance. Tape the box shut for at least 6 months. Much like a golfer who realizes that you feel the same about your game even if you improve 10 shots, the first lesson in wine aging is learning to not worry about when is the perfect time to drink the wine. 15 year old Yellow Tail may not taste good but it will taste interesting. Freshly bottled Bordeaux will leave your mouth dry with tannin but will leave an impression of its future greatness. There&rsquos no such thing as drinking wine on the perfect day of its apogee. Or as one wine writer put it, there are no great wines only great bottles.


The Gentleman’s Cellar: How to Start a Wine Cellar

Few experiences will overwhelm the senses with romantic anticipation like opening a bottle of old wine. It is the reason for wine&rsquos greatness in the world of beverages. The older the wine is, the greater the anticipation, and along with it the realities which are equally high and low: the disenfranchised regret of the bad ones, and the sensory ecstasy of the great ones. Old wines can become marker stones in the days that fly by and blur together. Through our wine cellars we are able to chronicle who we are and where we&rsquove been. Remember the night we drank the 2001 Von Schubert Kabinett? As clearly as if it were yesterday &ndash by closing my eyes I can still smell and taste every part of the wine. The moral of the story is that if you don&rsquot yet have a wine cellar, even a modest one, today is the day to start one.

The market has provided us with wine fridges of all shapes, sizes and prices. If you&rsquore lucky and can afford one, buy the biggest one you have a space for (or don&rsquot find to be obnoxious). If you don&rsquot want to go the wine fridge route, you may be even luckier. You get to create you cellar organically from wooden or cardboard boxes. You should put these boxes in the place with not necessarily the lowest temperature, but the most consistent. My wine sits in a corner in the basement, where the temperature fluctuates from 14 to 19 Celcius throughout the year.

You should put a little thought into how big you&rsquod like your cellar to get, and there&rsquos a way to calculate that number precisely. Add up how many aged wines you would like to drink every year, and multiply that number by how long sounds like a good time to age wine for you. For me that number is about 12 cases: 8-10 bottles per year and I like the idea of pulling out a 15-20 year old bottle. I started by buying a mixed case of 12 bottles that contained some of my favourite wines and some that I felt had labels that looked traditional and belonged in a wine cellar. Price was all over the map. Masi&rsquos Campofiorin was definitely in that first case. Try to shed the intimidation of not knowing what you&rsquore buying and rely on your instincts. Even the wine store owner likely doesn&rsquot have a full grasp on every wine in the store the adventure is the point of the wine cellar in the first place.

At first you will be your wine cellars&rsquo own worst enemy. The temptation is to immediately draw wine from the box, especially when you need a bottle in a pinch and you know it&rsquos there, or even worse when you&rsquore already a bottle down and get loose and curious. Buy a few extra bottles on top of the first 12 to give yourself insurance. Tape the box shut for at least 6 months. Much like a golfer who realizes that you feel the same about your game even if you improve 10 shots, the first lesson in wine aging is learning to not worry about when is the perfect time to drink the wine. 15 year old Yellow Tail may not taste good but it will taste interesting. Freshly bottled Bordeaux will leave your mouth dry with tannin but will leave an impression of its future greatness. There&rsquos no such thing as drinking wine on the perfect day of its apogee. Or as one wine writer put it, there are no great wines only great bottles.


The Gentleman’s Cellar: How to Start a Wine Cellar

Few experiences will overwhelm the senses with romantic anticipation like opening a bottle of old wine. It is the reason for wine&rsquos greatness in the world of beverages. The older the wine is, the greater the anticipation, and along with it the realities which are equally high and low: the disenfranchised regret of the bad ones, and the sensory ecstasy of the great ones. Old wines can become marker stones in the days that fly by and blur together. Through our wine cellars we are able to chronicle who we are and where we&rsquove been. Remember the night we drank the 2001 Von Schubert Kabinett? As clearly as if it were yesterday &ndash by closing my eyes I can still smell and taste every part of the wine. The moral of the story is that if you don&rsquot yet have a wine cellar, even a modest one, today is the day to start one.

The market has provided us with wine fridges of all shapes, sizes and prices. If you&rsquore lucky and can afford one, buy the biggest one you have a space for (or don&rsquot find to be obnoxious). If you don&rsquot want to go the wine fridge route, you may be even luckier. You get to create you cellar organically from wooden or cardboard boxes. You should put these boxes in the place with not necessarily the lowest temperature, but the most consistent. My wine sits in a corner in the basement, where the temperature fluctuates from 14 to 19 Celcius throughout the year.

You should put a little thought into how big you&rsquod like your cellar to get, and there&rsquos a way to calculate that number precisely. Add up how many aged wines you would like to drink every year, and multiply that number by how long sounds like a good time to age wine for you. For me that number is about 12 cases: 8-10 bottles per year and I like the idea of pulling out a 15-20 year old bottle. I started by buying a mixed case of 12 bottles that contained some of my favourite wines and some that I felt had labels that looked traditional and belonged in a wine cellar. Price was all over the map. Masi&rsquos Campofiorin was definitely in that first case. Try to shed the intimidation of not knowing what you&rsquore buying and rely on your instincts. Even the wine store owner likely doesn&rsquot have a full grasp on every wine in the store the adventure is the point of the wine cellar in the first place.

At first you will be your wine cellars&rsquo own worst enemy. The temptation is to immediately draw wine from the box, especially when you need a bottle in a pinch and you know it&rsquos there, or even worse when you&rsquore already a bottle down and get loose and curious. Buy a few extra bottles on top of the first 12 to give yourself insurance. Tape the box shut for at least 6 months. Much like a golfer who realizes that you feel the same about your game even if you improve 10 shots, the first lesson in wine aging is learning to not worry about when is the perfect time to drink the wine. 15 year old Yellow Tail may not taste good but it will taste interesting. Freshly bottled Bordeaux will leave your mouth dry with tannin but will leave an impression of its future greatness. There&rsquos no such thing as drinking wine on the perfect day of its apogee. Or as one wine writer put it, there are no great wines only great bottles.


The Gentleman’s Cellar: How to Start a Wine Cellar

Few experiences will overwhelm the senses with romantic anticipation like opening a bottle of old wine. It is the reason for wine&rsquos greatness in the world of beverages. The older the wine is, the greater the anticipation, and along with it the realities which are equally high and low: the disenfranchised regret of the bad ones, and the sensory ecstasy of the great ones. Old wines can become marker stones in the days that fly by and blur together. Through our wine cellars we are able to chronicle who we are and where we&rsquove been. Remember the night we drank the 2001 Von Schubert Kabinett? As clearly as if it were yesterday &ndash by closing my eyes I can still smell and taste every part of the wine. The moral of the story is that if you don&rsquot yet have a wine cellar, even a modest one, today is the day to start one.

The market has provided us with wine fridges of all shapes, sizes and prices. If you&rsquore lucky and can afford one, buy the biggest one you have a space for (or don&rsquot find to be obnoxious). If you don&rsquot want to go the wine fridge route, you may be even luckier. You get to create you cellar organically from wooden or cardboard boxes. You should put these boxes in the place with not necessarily the lowest temperature, but the most consistent. My wine sits in a corner in the basement, where the temperature fluctuates from 14 to 19 Celcius throughout the year.

You should put a little thought into how big you&rsquod like your cellar to get, and there&rsquos a way to calculate that number precisely. Add up how many aged wines you would like to drink every year, and multiply that number by how long sounds like a good time to age wine for you. For me that number is about 12 cases: 8-10 bottles per year and I like the idea of pulling out a 15-20 year old bottle. I started by buying a mixed case of 12 bottles that contained some of my favourite wines and some that I felt had labels that looked traditional and belonged in a wine cellar. Price was all over the map. Masi&rsquos Campofiorin was definitely in that first case. Try to shed the intimidation of not knowing what you&rsquore buying and rely on your instincts. Even the wine store owner likely doesn&rsquot have a full grasp on every wine in the store the adventure is the point of the wine cellar in the first place.

At first you will be your wine cellars&rsquo own worst enemy. The temptation is to immediately draw wine from the box, especially when you need a bottle in a pinch and you know it&rsquos there, or even worse when you&rsquore already a bottle down and get loose and curious. Buy a few extra bottles on top of the first 12 to give yourself insurance. Tape the box shut for at least 6 months. Much like a golfer who realizes that you feel the same about your game even if you improve 10 shots, the first lesson in wine aging is learning to not worry about when is the perfect time to drink the wine. 15 year old Yellow Tail may not taste good but it will taste interesting. Freshly bottled Bordeaux will leave your mouth dry with tannin but will leave an impression of its future greatness. There&rsquos no such thing as drinking wine on the perfect day of its apogee. Or as one wine writer put it, there are no great wines only great bottles.


The Gentleman’s Cellar: How to Start a Wine Cellar

Few experiences will overwhelm the senses with romantic anticipation like opening a bottle of old wine. It is the reason for wine&rsquos greatness in the world of beverages. The older the wine is, the greater the anticipation, and along with it the realities which are equally high and low: the disenfranchised regret of the bad ones, and the sensory ecstasy of the great ones. Old wines can become marker stones in the days that fly by and blur together. Through our wine cellars we are able to chronicle who we are and where we&rsquove been. Remember the night we drank the 2001 Von Schubert Kabinett? As clearly as if it were yesterday &ndash by closing my eyes I can still smell and taste every part of the wine. The moral of the story is that if you don&rsquot yet have a wine cellar, even a modest one, today is the day to start one.

The market has provided us with wine fridges of all shapes, sizes and prices. If you&rsquore lucky and can afford one, buy the biggest one you have a space for (or don&rsquot find to be obnoxious). If you don&rsquot want to go the wine fridge route, you may be even luckier. You get to create you cellar organically from wooden or cardboard boxes. You should put these boxes in the place with not necessarily the lowest temperature, but the most consistent. My wine sits in a corner in the basement, where the temperature fluctuates from 14 to 19 Celcius throughout the year.

You should put a little thought into how big you&rsquod like your cellar to get, and there&rsquos a way to calculate that number precisely. Add up how many aged wines you would like to drink every year, and multiply that number by how long sounds like a good time to age wine for you. For me that number is about 12 cases: 8-10 bottles per year and I like the idea of pulling out a 15-20 year old bottle. I started by buying a mixed case of 12 bottles that contained some of my favourite wines and some that I felt had labels that looked traditional and belonged in a wine cellar. Price was all over the map. Masi&rsquos Campofiorin was definitely in that first case. Try to shed the intimidation of not knowing what you&rsquore buying and rely on your instincts. Even the wine store owner likely doesn&rsquot have a full grasp on every wine in the store the adventure is the point of the wine cellar in the first place.

At first you will be your wine cellars&rsquo own worst enemy. The temptation is to immediately draw wine from the box, especially when you need a bottle in a pinch and you know it&rsquos there, or even worse when you&rsquore already a bottle down and get loose and curious. Buy a few extra bottles on top of the first 12 to give yourself insurance. Tape the box shut for at least 6 months. Much like a golfer who realizes that you feel the same about your game even if you improve 10 shots, the first lesson in wine aging is learning to not worry about when is the perfect time to drink the wine. 15 year old Yellow Tail may not taste good but it will taste interesting. Freshly bottled Bordeaux will leave your mouth dry with tannin but will leave an impression of its future greatness. There&rsquos no such thing as drinking wine on the perfect day of its apogee. Or as one wine writer put it, there are no great wines only great bottles.


The Gentleman’s Cellar: How to Start a Wine Cellar

Few experiences will overwhelm the senses with romantic anticipation like opening a bottle of old wine. It is the reason for wine&rsquos greatness in the world of beverages. The older the wine is, the greater the anticipation, and along with it the realities which are equally high and low: the disenfranchised regret of the bad ones, and the sensory ecstasy of the great ones. Old wines can become marker stones in the days that fly by and blur together. Through our wine cellars we are able to chronicle who we are and where we&rsquove been. Remember the night we drank the 2001 Von Schubert Kabinett? As clearly as if it were yesterday &ndash by closing my eyes I can still smell and taste every part of the wine. The moral of the story is that if you don&rsquot yet have a wine cellar, even a modest one, today is the day to start one.

The market has provided us with wine fridges of all shapes, sizes and prices. If you&rsquore lucky and can afford one, buy the biggest one you have a space for (or don&rsquot find to be obnoxious). If you don&rsquot want to go the wine fridge route, you may be even luckier. You get to create you cellar organically from wooden or cardboard boxes. You should put these boxes in the place with not necessarily the lowest temperature, but the most consistent. My wine sits in a corner in the basement, where the temperature fluctuates from 14 to 19 Celcius throughout the year.

You should put a little thought into how big you&rsquod like your cellar to get, and there&rsquos a way to calculate that number precisely. Add up how many aged wines you would like to drink every year, and multiply that number by how long sounds like a good time to age wine for you. For me that number is about 12 cases: 8-10 bottles per year and I like the idea of pulling out a 15-20 year old bottle. I started by buying a mixed case of 12 bottles that contained some of my favourite wines and some that I felt had labels that looked traditional and belonged in a wine cellar. Price was all over the map. Masi&rsquos Campofiorin was definitely in that first case. Try to shed the intimidation of not knowing what you&rsquore buying and rely on your instincts. Even the wine store owner likely doesn&rsquot have a full grasp on every wine in the store the adventure is the point of the wine cellar in the first place.

At first you will be your wine cellars&rsquo own worst enemy. The temptation is to immediately draw wine from the box, especially when you need a bottle in a pinch and you know it&rsquos there, or even worse when you&rsquore already a bottle down and get loose and curious. Buy a few extra bottles on top of the first 12 to give yourself insurance. Tape the box shut for at least 6 months. Much like a golfer who realizes that you feel the same about your game even if you improve 10 shots, the first lesson in wine aging is learning to not worry about when is the perfect time to drink the wine. 15 year old Yellow Tail may not taste good but it will taste interesting. Freshly bottled Bordeaux will leave your mouth dry with tannin but will leave an impression of its future greatness. There&rsquos no such thing as drinking wine on the perfect day of its apogee. Or as one wine writer put it, there are no great wines only great bottles.


The Gentleman’s Cellar: How to Start a Wine Cellar

Few experiences will overwhelm the senses with romantic anticipation like opening a bottle of old wine. It is the reason for wine&rsquos greatness in the world of beverages. The older the wine is, the greater the anticipation, and along with it the realities which are equally high and low: the disenfranchised regret of the bad ones, and the sensory ecstasy of the great ones. Old wines can become marker stones in the days that fly by and blur together. Through our wine cellars we are able to chronicle who we are and where we&rsquove been. Remember the night we drank the 2001 Von Schubert Kabinett? As clearly as if it were yesterday &ndash by closing my eyes I can still smell and taste every part of the wine. The moral of the story is that if you don&rsquot yet have a wine cellar, even a modest one, today is the day to start one.

The market has provided us with wine fridges of all shapes, sizes and prices. If you&rsquore lucky and can afford one, buy the biggest one you have a space for (or don&rsquot find to be obnoxious). If you don&rsquot want to go the wine fridge route, you may be even luckier. You get to create you cellar organically from wooden or cardboard boxes. You should put these boxes in the place with not necessarily the lowest temperature, but the most consistent. My wine sits in a corner in the basement, where the temperature fluctuates from 14 to 19 Celcius throughout the year.

You should put a little thought into how big you&rsquod like your cellar to get, and there&rsquos a way to calculate that number precisely. Add up how many aged wines you would like to drink every year, and multiply that number by how long sounds like a good time to age wine for you. For me that number is about 12 cases: 8-10 bottles per year and I like the idea of pulling out a 15-20 year old bottle. I started by buying a mixed case of 12 bottles that contained some of my favourite wines and some that I felt had labels that looked traditional and belonged in a wine cellar. Price was all over the map. Masi&rsquos Campofiorin was definitely in that first case. Try to shed the intimidation of not knowing what you&rsquore buying and rely on your instincts. Even the wine store owner likely doesn&rsquot have a full grasp on every wine in the store the adventure is the point of the wine cellar in the first place.

At first you will be your wine cellars&rsquo own worst enemy. The temptation is to immediately draw wine from the box, especially when you need a bottle in a pinch and you know it&rsquos there, or even worse when you&rsquore already a bottle down and get loose and curious. Buy a few extra bottles on top of the first 12 to give yourself insurance. Tape the box shut for at least 6 months. Much like a golfer who realizes that you feel the same about your game even if you improve 10 shots, the first lesson in wine aging is learning to not worry about when is the perfect time to drink the wine. 15 year old Yellow Tail may not taste good but it will taste interesting. Freshly bottled Bordeaux will leave your mouth dry with tannin but will leave an impression of its future greatness. There&rsquos no such thing as drinking wine on the perfect day of its apogee. Or as one wine writer put it, there are no great wines only great bottles.


The Gentleman’s Cellar: How to Start a Wine Cellar

Few experiences will overwhelm the senses with romantic anticipation like opening a bottle of old wine. It is the reason for wine&rsquos greatness in the world of beverages. The older the wine is, the greater the anticipation, and along with it the realities which are equally high and low: the disenfranchised regret of the bad ones, and the sensory ecstasy of the great ones. Old wines can become marker stones in the days that fly by and blur together. Through our wine cellars we are able to chronicle who we are and where we&rsquove been. Remember the night we drank the 2001 Von Schubert Kabinett? As clearly as if it were yesterday &ndash by closing my eyes I can still smell and taste every part of the wine. The moral of the story is that if you don&rsquot yet have a wine cellar, even a modest one, today is the day to start one.

The market has provided us with wine fridges of all shapes, sizes and prices. If you&rsquore lucky and can afford one, buy the biggest one you have a space for (or don&rsquot find to be obnoxious). If you don&rsquot want to go the wine fridge route, you may be even luckier. You get to create you cellar organically from wooden or cardboard boxes. You should put these boxes in the place with not necessarily the lowest temperature, but the most consistent. My wine sits in a corner in the basement, where the temperature fluctuates from 14 to 19 Celcius throughout the year.

You should put a little thought into how big you&rsquod like your cellar to get, and there&rsquos a way to calculate that number precisely. Add up how many aged wines you would like to drink every year, and multiply that number by how long sounds like a good time to age wine for you. For me that number is about 12 cases: 8-10 bottles per year and I like the idea of pulling out a 15-20 year old bottle. I started by buying a mixed case of 12 bottles that contained some of my favourite wines and some that I felt had labels that looked traditional and belonged in a wine cellar. Price was all over the map. Masi&rsquos Campofiorin was definitely in that first case. Try to shed the intimidation of not knowing what you&rsquore buying and rely on your instincts. Even the wine store owner likely doesn&rsquot have a full grasp on every wine in the store the adventure is the point of the wine cellar in the first place.

At first you will be your wine cellars&rsquo own worst enemy. The temptation is to immediately draw wine from the box, especially when you need a bottle in a pinch and you know it&rsquos there, or even worse when you&rsquore already a bottle down and get loose and curious. Buy a few extra bottles on top of the first 12 to give yourself insurance. Tape the box shut for at least 6 months. Much like a golfer who realizes that you feel the same about your game even if you improve 10 shots, the first lesson in wine aging is learning to not worry about when is the perfect time to drink the wine. 15 year old Yellow Tail may not taste good but it will taste interesting. Freshly bottled Bordeaux will leave your mouth dry with tannin but will leave an impression of its future greatness. There&rsquos no such thing as drinking wine on the perfect day of its apogee. Or as one wine writer put it, there are no great wines only great bottles.



Comments:

  1. Fenrijas

    There is something in this. Now everything is clear, thank you for your help in this matter.

  2. Agnimukha

    Listen, let's not spend more time for it.

  3. Pan

    Great question

  4. Ram

    I mean you are not right. I can prove it.

  5. Noell

    I congratulate, very good thinking

  6. Eallard

    strongly disagree with the previous post



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