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Quince Cheese

Quince Cheese


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Place the fruit into a large heavy-bottomed saucepan or preserving pan and cover with water, so that the waterline sits an inch or so [a few cm] above the line of the fruit. Place the pan on high heat and bring the water up to a simmer. Place the lid on the pan, turn down the heat, and simmer for about 60 minutes, until the fruit is soft and broken down, and you’re left with something approaching a fruit pulp. (If you don’t have a lid, don’t worry—just keep an eye on the amount of water in the pan and top up if you need to.)

Once the fruit is cooked, remove the pan from the heat and allow it to stand for 30 minutes or so. Then, place a sturdy strainer over a bowl and pour the pulp out of the pan into the strainer. Use the back of a ladle to force the pulp through the strainer into the bowl. Alternatively, you can put the pulp through a mouli, if you have one.

Weigh the contents of the bowl and add two-thirds of that weight in granulated sugar. Clean the cooking pan, and then return the sweetened quince mixture to it. Set it over medium heat, and bring it up to a simmer, stirring or whisking regularly for about 60 minutes or more, until the mixture has thickened, so that a wooden spoon dragged through it reveals the base of the pan for a couple of seconds before the mixture comes together again. It may begin to bubble, but keep stirring and it won’t burn. Don’t rush.

Pour the quince into sterilized jars and seal. Store in a cool place (it will keep for several months) until you’re ready to use it.


QUINCE CHEESE

Fruit Cheeses are closely related to jams and jellies but have a firmer texture and are usually served moulded and cut into chunks as an accompaniment to roast or cold meats. Quince really makes the best cheese and is a wonderful rich amber colour. It is a particular speciality of Spain and is traditionally eaten as a sweet snack. This recipe will keep for 2 years and makes a wonderful and unusual gift.

Ingredients
• 1.5kg ripe quinces
• 2 litres water or dry cider
• 2-3 strips of lemon rind
• juice of ½ lemon
• preserving or granulated sugar
• groundnut oil, for brushing
• caster sugar, for dusting

Directions
1.
Wash the quinces well to remove the fluff and chop coarsely. Place in a preserving pan and cover with water or cider, adding the lemon rind and juice. Bring to the boil and then simmer for 30-40 minutes until very soft.

2. Either press the mixture through a sieve or pass through a food mill. Measure the puree and allow 400g of sugar for every 500ml of puree.

3. Clean the pan and put in the puree and sugar. Bring slowly to the boil, stirring until all the sugar has dissolved. Reduce the heat and simmer for 2-3 hours until the mixture becomes very thick. Turn off the heat and allow to cool slightly.

4. Brush a baking or roasting tin with oil and pour the cooled cheese into it, smoothing to a layer about 3-4cm thick. Cool completely, cover with a clean cloth and leave for 24 hours in a warm dry place.

5. Loosen the cheese from the tin with a knife and turn out onto greaseproof paper. Cut into squares or diamonds and dust with caster sugar. Arrange on a baking try and leave to dry, loosely covered with baking parchment.

6. Store in an airtight container with layers of waxed paper between the layers.


QUINCE CHEESE

Fruit Cheeses are closely related to jams and jellies but have a firmer texture and are usually served moulded and cut into chunks as an accompaniment to roast or cold meats. Quince really makes the best cheese and is a wonderful rich amber colour. It is a particular speciality of Spain and is traditionally eaten as a sweet snack. This recipe will keep for 2 years and makes a wonderful and unusual gift.

Ingredients
• 1.5kg ripe quinces
• 2 litres water or dry cider
• 2-3 strips of lemon rind
• juice of ½ lemon
• preserving or granulated sugar
• groundnut oil, for brushing
• caster sugar, for dusting

Directions
1.
Wash the quinces well to remove the fluff and chop coarsely. Place in a preserving pan and cover with water or cider, adding the lemon rind and juice. Bring to the boil and then simmer for 30-40 minutes until very soft.

2. Either press the mixture through a sieve or pass through a food mill. Measure the puree and allow 400g of sugar for every 500ml of puree.

3. Clean the pan and put in the puree and sugar. Bring slowly to the boil, stirring until all the sugar has dissolved. Reduce the heat and simmer for 2-3 hours until the mixture becomes very thick. Turn off the heat and allow to cool slightly.

4. Brush a baking or roasting tin with oil and pour the cooled cheese into it, smoothing to a layer about 3-4cm thick. Cool completely, cover with a clean cloth and leave for 24 hours in a warm dry place.

5. Loosen the cheese from the tin with a knife and turn out onto greaseproof paper. Cut into squares or diamonds and dust with caster sugar. Arrange on a baking try and leave to dry, loosely covered with baking parchment.

6. Store in an airtight container with layers of waxed paper between the layers.


QUINCE CHEESE

Fruit Cheeses are closely related to jams and jellies but have a firmer texture and are usually served moulded and cut into chunks as an accompaniment to roast or cold meats. Quince really makes the best cheese and is a wonderful rich amber colour. It is a particular speciality of Spain and is traditionally eaten as a sweet snack. This recipe will keep for 2 years and makes a wonderful and unusual gift.

Ingredients
• 1.5kg ripe quinces
• 2 litres water or dry cider
• 2-3 strips of lemon rind
• juice of ½ lemon
• preserving or granulated sugar
• groundnut oil, for brushing
• caster sugar, for dusting

Directions
1.
Wash the quinces well to remove the fluff and chop coarsely. Place in a preserving pan and cover with water or cider, adding the lemon rind and juice. Bring to the boil and then simmer for 30-40 minutes until very soft.

2. Either press the mixture through a sieve or pass through a food mill. Measure the puree and allow 400g of sugar for every 500ml of puree.

3. Clean the pan and put in the puree and sugar. Bring slowly to the boil, stirring until all the sugar has dissolved. Reduce the heat and simmer for 2-3 hours until the mixture becomes very thick. Turn off the heat and allow to cool slightly.

4. Brush a baking or roasting tin with oil and pour the cooled cheese into it, smoothing to a layer about 3-4cm thick. Cool completely, cover with a clean cloth and leave for 24 hours in a warm dry place.

5. Loosen the cheese from the tin with a knife and turn out onto greaseproof paper. Cut into squares or diamonds and dust with caster sugar. Arrange on a baking try and leave to dry, loosely covered with baking parchment.

6. Store in an airtight container with layers of waxed paper between the layers.


QUINCE CHEESE

Fruit Cheeses are closely related to jams and jellies but have a firmer texture and are usually served moulded and cut into chunks as an accompaniment to roast or cold meats. Quince really makes the best cheese and is a wonderful rich amber colour. It is a particular speciality of Spain and is traditionally eaten as a sweet snack. This recipe will keep for 2 years and makes a wonderful and unusual gift.

Ingredients
• 1.5kg ripe quinces
• 2 litres water or dry cider
• 2-3 strips of lemon rind
• juice of ½ lemon
• preserving or granulated sugar
• groundnut oil, for brushing
• caster sugar, for dusting

Directions
1.
Wash the quinces well to remove the fluff and chop coarsely. Place in a preserving pan and cover with water or cider, adding the lemon rind and juice. Bring to the boil and then simmer for 30-40 minutes until very soft.

2. Either press the mixture through a sieve or pass through a food mill. Measure the puree and allow 400g of sugar for every 500ml of puree.

3. Clean the pan and put in the puree and sugar. Bring slowly to the boil, stirring until all the sugar has dissolved. Reduce the heat and simmer for 2-3 hours until the mixture becomes very thick. Turn off the heat and allow to cool slightly.

4. Brush a baking or roasting tin with oil and pour the cooled cheese into it, smoothing to a layer about 3-4cm thick. Cool completely, cover with a clean cloth and leave for 24 hours in a warm dry place.

5. Loosen the cheese from the tin with a knife and turn out onto greaseproof paper. Cut into squares or diamonds and dust with caster sugar. Arrange on a baking try and leave to dry, loosely covered with baking parchment.

6. Store in an airtight container with layers of waxed paper between the layers.


QUINCE CHEESE

Fruit Cheeses are closely related to jams and jellies but have a firmer texture and are usually served moulded and cut into chunks as an accompaniment to roast or cold meats. Quince really makes the best cheese and is a wonderful rich amber colour. It is a particular speciality of Spain and is traditionally eaten as a sweet snack. This recipe will keep for 2 years and makes a wonderful and unusual gift.

Ingredients
• 1.5kg ripe quinces
• 2 litres water or dry cider
• 2-3 strips of lemon rind
• juice of ½ lemon
• preserving or granulated sugar
• groundnut oil, for brushing
• caster sugar, for dusting

Directions
1.
Wash the quinces well to remove the fluff and chop coarsely. Place in a preserving pan and cover with water or cider, adding the lemon rind and juice. Bring to the boil and then simmer for 30-40 minutes until very soft.

2. Either press the mixture through a sieve or pass through a food mill. Measure the puree and allow 400g of sugar for every 500ml of puree.

3. Clean the pan and put in the puree and sugar. Bring slowly to the boil, stirring until all the sugar has dissolved. Reduce the heat and simmer for 2-3 hours until the mixture becomes very thick. Turn off the heat and allow to cool slightly.

4. Brush a baking or roasting tin with oil and pour the cooled cheese into it, smoothing to a layer about 3-4cm thick. Cool completely, cover with a clean cloth and leave for 24 hours in a warm dry place.

5. Loosen the cheese from the tin with a knife and turn out onto greaseproof paper. Cut into squares or diamonds and dust with caster sugar. Arrange on a baking try and leave to dry, loosely covered with baking parchment.

6. Store in an airtight container with layers of waxed paper between the layers.


QUINCE CHEESE

Fruit Cheeses are closely related to jams and jellies but have a firmer texture and are usually served moulded and cut into chunks as an accompaniment to roast or cold meats. Quince really makes the best cheese and is a wonderful rich amber colour. It is a particular speciality of Spain and is traditionally eaten as a sweet snack. This recipe will keep for 2 years and makes a wonderful and unusual gift.

Ingredients
• 1.5kg ripe quinces
• 2 litres water or dry cider
• 2-3 strips of lemon rind
• juice of ½ lemon
• preserving or granulated sugar
• groundnut oil, for brushing
• caster sugar, for dusting

Directions
1.
Wash the quinces well to remove the fluff and chop coarsely. Place in a preserving pan and cover with water or cider, adding the lemon rind and juice. Bring to the boil and then simmer for 30-40 minutes until very soft.

2. Either press the mixture through a sieve or pass through a food mill. Measure the puree and allow 400g of sugar for every 500ml of puree.

3. Clean the pan and put in the puree and sugar. Bring slowly to the boil, stirring until all the sugar has dissolved. Reduce the heat and simmer for 2-3 hours until the mixture becomes very thick. Turn off the heat and allow to cool slightly.

4. Brush a baking or roasting tin with oil and pour the cooled cheese into it, smoothing to a layer about 3-4cm thick. Cool completely, cover with a clean cloth and leave for 24 hours in a warm dry place.

5. Loosen the cheese from the tin with a knife and turn out onto greaseproof paper. Cut into squares or diamonds and dust with caster sugar. Arrange on a baking try and leave to dry, loosely covered with baking parchment.

6. Store in an airtight container with layers of waxed paper between the layers.


QUINCE CHEESE

Fruit Cheeses are closely related to jams and jellies but have a firmer texture and are usually served moulded and cut into chunks as an accompaniment to roast or cold meats. Quince really makes the best cheese and is a wonderful rich amber colour. It is a particular speciality of Spain and is traditionally eaten as a sweet snack. This recipe will keep for 2 years and makes a wonderful and unusual gift.

Ingredients
• 1.5kg ripe quinces
• 2 litres water or dry cider
• 2-3 strips of lemon rind
• juice of ½ lemon
• preserving or granulated sugar
• groundnut oil, for brushing
• caster sugar, for dusting

Directions
1.
Wash the quinces well to remove the fluff and chop coarsely. Place in a preserving pan and cover with water or cider, adding the lemon rind and juice. Bring to the boil and then simmer for 30-40 minutes until very soft.

2. Either press the mixture through a sieve or pass through a food mill. Measure the puree and allow 400g of sugar for every 500ml of puree.

3. Clean the pan and put in the puree and sugar. Bring slowly to the boil, stirring until all the sugar has dissolved. Reduce the heat and simmer for 2-3 hours until the mixture becomes very thick. Turn off the heat and allow to cool slightly.

4. Brush a baking or roasting tin with oil and pour the cooled cheese into it, smoothing to a layer about 3-4cm thick. Cool completely, cover with a clean cloth and leave for 24 hours in a warm dry place.

5. Loosen the cheese from the tin with a knife and turn out onto greaseproof paper. Cut into squares or diamonds and dust with caster sugar. Arrange on a baking try and leave to dry, loosely covered with baking parchment.

6. Store in an airtight container with layers of waxed paper between the layers.


QUINCE CHEESE

Fruit Cheeses are closely related to jams and jellies but have a firmer texture and are usually served moulded and cut into chunks as an accompaniment to roast or cold meats. Quince really makes the best cheese and is a wonderful rich amber colour. It is a particular speciality of Spain and is traditionally eaten as a sweet snack. This recipe will keep for 2 years and makes a wonderful and unusual gift.

Ingredients
• 1.5kg ripe quinces
• 2 litres water or dry cider
• 2-3 strips of lemon rind
• juice of ½ lemon
• preserving or granulated sugar
• groundnut oil, for brushing
• caster sugar, for dusting

Directions
1.
Wash the quinces well to remove the fluff and chop coarsely. Place in a preserving pan and cover with water or cider, adding the lemon rind and juice. Bring to the boil and then simmer for 30-40 minutes until very soft.

2. Either press the mixture through a sieve or pass through a food mill. Measure the puree and allow 400g of sugar for every 500ml of puree.

3. Clean the pan and put in the puree and sugar. Bring slowly to the boil, stirring until all the sugar has dissolved. Reduce the heat and simmer for 2-3 hours until the mixture becomes very thick. Turn off the heat and allow to cool slightly.

4. Brush a baking or roasting tin with oil and pour the cooled cheese into it, smoothing to a layer about 3-4cm thick. Cool completely, cover with a clean cloth and leave for 24 hours in a warm dry place.

5. Loosen the cheese from the tin with a knife and turn out onto greaseproof paper. Cut into squares or diamonds and dust with caster sugar. Arrange on a baking try and leave to dry, loosely covered with baking parchment.

6. Store in an airtight container with layers of waxed paper between the layers.


QUINCE CHEESE

Fruit Cheeses are closely related to jams and jellies but have a firmer texture and are usually served moulded and cut into chunks as an accompaniment to roast or cold meats. Quince really makes the best cheese and is a wonderful rich amber colour. It is a particular speciality of Spain and is traditionally eaten as a sweet snack. This recipe will keep for 2 years and makes a wonderful and unusual gift.

Ingredients
• 1.5kg ripe quinces
• 2 litres water or dry cider
• 2-3 strips of lemon rind
• juice of ½ lemon
• preserving or granulated sugar
• groundnut oil, for brushing
• caster sugar, for dusting

Directions
1.
Wash the quinces well to remove the fluff and chop coarsely. Place in a preserving pan and cover with water or cider, adding the lemon rind and juice. Bring to the boil and then simmer for 30-40 minutes until very soft.

2. Either press the mixture through a sieve or pass through a food mill. Measure the puree and allow 400g of sugar for every 500ml of puree.

3. Clean the pan and put in the puree and sugar. Bring slowly to the boil, stirring until all the sugar has dissolved. Reduce the heat and simmer for 2-3 hours until the mixture becomes very thick. Turn off the heat and allow to cool slightly.

4. Brush a baking or roasting tin with oil and pour the cooled cheese into it, smoothing to a layer about 3-4cm thick. Cool completely, cover with a clean cloth and leave for 24 hours in a warm dry place.

5. Loosen the cheese from the tin with a knife and turn out onto greaseproof paper. Cut into squares or diamonds and dust with caster sugar. Arrange on a baking try and leave to dry, loosely covered with baking parchment.

6. Store in an airtight container with layers of waxed paper between the layers.


QUINCE CHEESE

Fruit Cheeses are closely related to jams and jellies but have a firmer texture and are usually served moulded and cut into chunks as an accompaniment to roast or cold meats. Quince really makes the best cheese and is a wonderful rich amber colour. It is a particular speciality of Spain and is traditionally eaten as a sweet snack. This recipe will keep for 2 years and makes a wonderful and unusual gift.

Ingredients
• 1.5kg ripe quinces
• 2 litres water or dry cider
• 2-3 strips of lemon rind
• juice of ½ lemon
• preserving or granulated sugar
• groundnut oil, for brushing
• caster sugar, for dusting

Directions
1.
Wash the quinces well to remove the fluff and chop coarsely. Place in a preserving pan and cover with water or cider, adding the lemon rind and juice. Bring to the boil and then simmer for 30-40 minutes until very soft.

2. Either press the mixture through a sieve or pass through a food mill. Measure the puree and allow 400g of sugar for every 500ml of puree.

3. Clean the pan and put in the puree and sugar. Bring slowly to the boil, stirring until all the sugar has dissolved. Reduce the heat and simmer for 2-3 hours until the mixture becomes very thick. Turn off the heat and allow to cool slightly.

4. Brush a baking or roasting tin with oil and pour the cooled cheese into it, smoothing to a layer about 3-4cm thick. Cool completely, cover with a clean cloth and leave for 24 hours in a warm dry place.

5. Loosen the cheese from the tin with a knife and turn out onto greaseproof paper. Cut into squares or diamonds and dust with caster sugar. Arrange on a baking try and leave to dry, loosely covered with baking parchment.

6. Store in an airtight container with layers of waxed paper between the layers.


Watch the video: Quince Review +Quince cheese recipe Weird Fruit Explorer Ep. 122


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